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Psalms 129:6

    Psalms 129:6 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    Let them be as the grass upon the housetops, which withereth afore it groweth up:

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    Let them be as the grass on the housetops, which wither before it grows up:

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    Let them be as the grass upon the housetops, Which withereth before it groweth up;

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    Let them be like the grass on the house-tops, which is dry before it comes to full growth.

    Webster's Revision

    Let them be as the grass upon the housetops, Which withereth before it groweth up;

    World English Bible

    Let them be as the grass on the housetops, which withers before it grows up;

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    Let them be as the grass upon the housetops, which withereth afore it groweth up:

    Definitions for Psalms 129:6

    Afore - Before.
    Let - To hinder or obstruct.

    Clarke's Commentary on Psalms 129:6

    As the grass upon the housetops - As in the east the roofs of the houses were flat, seeds of various kinds falling upon them would naturally vegetate, though in an imperfect way; and, because of the want of proper nourishment, would necessarily dry and wither away. If grass, the mower cannot make hay of it; if corn, the reaper cannot make a sheaf of it. Let the Babylonians be like such herbage - good for nothing, and come to nothing.

    Withereth afore it groweth up - Before שלק shalak, it is unsheathed; i.e., before it ears, or comes to seed.

    Barnes' Notes on Psalms 129:6

    Let them be as the grass upon the housetops - The housetops, or roofs of houses, covered with sand or earth, in which seeds of grass may germinate and begin to grow, but where, as there is no depth of earth, and as the heat of the sun there would be intense, it would soon wither away. See the notes at Isaiah 37:27.

    Which withereth afore it groweth up - This, even if it has any meaning, is not the meaning of the original. The idea in the Hebrew is - and it is so rendered in the Septuagint, the Latin Vulgate, and by Luther - "which before (one) pulls it, withers." Grass would wither or dry up, of course, if it were pulled up or cut down, but the grass here spoken of withers even before this is done. It has no depth of earth to sustain it; having sprouted, and begun to grow, it soon dies - a perfect image of feebleness and desolation; of hopes begun only to be disappointed. "This morning" (says Dr. Thomson, "Land and the Book," vol. ii., p. 574) "I saw a striking illustration of this most expressive figure. To obtain a good view of the Tyropean, my guide took me to the top of a house on the brow of Zion, and the grass which had grown over the roof during the rainy season was now entirely withered and perfectly dry."

    Wesley's Notes on Psalms 129:6

    129:6 House - tops - Which there were flat. Which - Having no deep root, never comes to maturity. And so all their designs shall be abortive.