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Psalms 13:3

    Psalms 13:3 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    Consider and hear me, O LORD my God: lighten mine eyes, lest I sleep the sleep of death;

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    Consider and hear me, O LORD my God: lighten my eyes, lest I sleep the sleep of death;

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    Consider and answer me, O Jehovah my God: Lighten mine eyes, lest I sleep the'sleep of death;

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    Let my voice come before you, and give me an answer, O Lord my God; let your light be shining on me, so that the sleep of death may not overtake me;

    Webster's Revision

    Consider and answer me, O Jehovah my God: Lighten mine eyes, lest I sleep the'sleep of death;

    World English Bible

    Behold, and answer me, Yahweh, my God. Give light to my eyes, lest I sleep in death;

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    Consider and answer me, O LORD my God: lighten mine eyes, lest I sleep the sleep of death;

    Clarke's Commentary on Psalms 13:3

    Consider and hear me - Rather, answer me. I have prayed; I am seeking thy face I am lost without thee; I am in darkness; my life draws nigh to destruction; if I die unforgiven, I die eternally. O Lord my God, consider this; hear and answer, for thy name's sake.

    Barnes' Notes on Psalms 13:3

    Consider and hear me - literally, "Look, hear me." God had seemed to avert his face as if he would not even look upon him Psalm 13:1; and the psalmist now prays that he "would" look upon him - that he would regard his wants - that he would attend to his cry. So we pray to one who turns away from us as if he were not disposed to hear, and as if he cared nothing about us.

    Lighten mine eyes - The allusion here is, probably, to his exhaustion, arising from trouble and despair, as if he were about to die. The sight grows dim as death approaches; and he seemed to feel that death was near. He says that unless God should interpose, the darkness would deepen, and he must die. The prayer, therefore, that God would "enlighten his eyes," was a prayer that he would interpose and save him from that death which he felt was rapidly approaching.

    Lest I sleep the sleep of death - literally, "Lest I sleep the death;" that is, "in" death, or, as in the common version, the sleep of death. The idea is, that death, whose approach was indicated by the dimness of vision, was fast stealing over him as a sleep, and that unless his clearness of vision were restored, it would soon end in the total darkness - the deep and profound sleep - of death. Death is often compared to sleep. See the note at 1 Corinthians 11:30; the note at John 11:11, John 11:13; 1 Thessalonians 4:14; Daniel 12:2. The resemblance between the two is so obvious as to have been remarked in all ages, and the comparison is found in the writings of all nations. It is only, however, in connection with Christianity that the idea has been fully carried out by the doctrine of the resurrection, for as we lie down at night with the hope of awaking to the pursuits and enjoyments of a new day, so the Christian lies down in death with the hope of awaking in the morning of the resurrection to the pursuits and enjoyments of a new and eternal day. Everywhere else death is, to the mind, a long and unbroken sleep. Compare Jeremiah 51:39, Jeremiah 51:57.

    Wesley's Notes on Psalms 13:3

    13:3 Lighten - Revive and comfort, and deliver me from the darkness of death, which is ready to come upon me.