Psalms 130 :1

Psalms 130 :1 Translations

American King James Version (AKJV)

Out of the depths have I cried to you, O LORD.

King James Version (KJV)

Out of the depths have I cried to you, O LORD.

American Standard Version (ASV)

Out of the depths have I cried unto thee, O Jehovah.

Basic English Translation (BBE)

<A Song of the going up.> Out of the deep have I sent up my cry to you, O Lord.

Webster's Revision

A Song of degrees. Out of the depths have I cried to thee, O LORD.

World English Bible

Out of the depths I have cried to you, Yahweh.

English Revised Version (ERV)

A Song of Ascents. Out of the depths have I cried unto thee, O LORD.

Definitions for Psalms 130 :1

Clarke's Commentary on Psalms 130 :1

Out of the depths - The captives in Babylon represent their condition like those who are in a prison - an abyss or deep ditch, ready to be swallowed up.

Barnes' Commentary on Psalms 130 :1

Out of the depths - The word rendered "depths" is from a verb - עמק ‛âmaq - which means to be deep; then, to be unsearchable; then, to make deep; and it would apply to anything low, deep, or profound, as the ocean, a pit, or a valley. The word used here occurs elsewhere only in the following places: Psalm 69:2, Psalm 69:14, where it is rendered "deep," applied to waters; and Isaiah 51:10; Ezekiel 27:34, where it is rendered "depths." The word, as used here, would be applicable to deep affliction, dejection, or distress. It would be applicable

(a) to affliction - the depths of sorrow from loss of friends, property, or bodily suffering;

(b) sin - the depths into which the soul is plunged under the consciousness of guilt;

(c) mental trouble - low spirits - melancholy - darkness of mind - loss of comfort in religion - powerful temptation - disappointment - the anguish caused by ingratitude - or sadness of heart in view of the crimes and the sorrows of people - or grief at the coldness, the hardness, the insensibility of our friends to their spiritual condition.

From all these depths of sorrow it is our privilege to call upon the Lord; in those depths of sorrow it is proper thus to implore his help. Often he brings us into these "depths" that we may be led to call upon him; always when we are brought there, we should call upon him.

Have I cried unto thee, O Lord - Or rather, "do I now invoke thee," or call earnestly upon thee. The language does not refer so much to the past as the present. I now cry for mercy; I now implore thy blessing. The condition is that of one who in deep sorrow, or under deep conviction for sin, pleads earnestly that God would have compassion on him.

Wesley's Commentary on Psalms 130 :1

Bible Search:
Powered by Bible Study Tools