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Psalms 130:1

    Psalms 130:1 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    Out of the depths have I cried unto thee, O LORD.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    Out of the depths have I cried to you, O LORD.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    Out of the depths have I cried unto thee, O Jehovah.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    <A Song of the going up.> Out of the deep have I sent up my cry to you, O Lord.

    Webster's Revision

    Out of the depths have I cried unto thee, O Jehovah.

    World English Bible

    Out of the depths I have cried to you, Yahweh.

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    A Song of Ascents. Out of the depths have I cried unto thee, O LORD.

    Clarke's Commentary on Psalms 130:1

    Out of the depths - The captives in Babylon represent their condition like those who are in a prison - an abyss or deep ditch, ready to be swallowed up.

    Barnes' Notes on Psalms 130:1

    Out of the depths - The word rendered "depths" is from a verb - עמק ‛âmaq - which means to be deep; then, to be unsearchable; then, to make deep; and it would apply to anything low, deep, or profound, as the ocean, a pit, or a valley. The word used here occurs elsewhere only in the following places: Psalm 69:2, Psalm 69:14, where it is rendered "deep," applied to waters; and Isaiah 51:10; Ezekiel 27:34, where it is rendered "depths." The word, as used here, would be applicable to deep affliction, dejection, or distress. It would be applicable

    (a) to affliction - the depths of sorrow from loss of friends, property, or bodily suffering;

    (b) sin - the depths into which the soul is plunged under the consciousness of guilt;

    (c) mental trouble - low spirits - melancholy - darkness of mind - loss of comfort in religion - powerful temptation - disappointment - the anguish caused by ingratitude - or sadness of heart in view of the crimes and the sorrows of people - or grief at the coldness, the hardness, the insensibility of our friends to their spiritual condition.

    From all these depths of sorrow it is our privilege to call upon the Lord; in those depths of sorrow it is proper thus to implore his help. Often he brings us into these "depths" that we may be led to call upon him; always when we are brought there, we should call upon him.

    Have I cried unto thee, O Lord - Or rather, "do I now invoke thee," or call earnestly upon thee. The language does not refer so much to the past as the present. I now cry for mercy; I now implore thy blessing. The condition is that of one who in deep sorrow, or under deep conviction for sin, pleads earnestly that God would have compassion on him.