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Psalms 132:10

    Psalms 132:10 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    For thy servant David's sake turn not away the face of thine anointed.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    For your servant David's sake turn not away the face of your anointed.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    For thy servant David's sake Turn not away the face of thine anointed.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    Because of your servant David, do not give up your king.

    Webster's Revision

    For thy servant David's sake Turn not away the face of thine anointed.

    World English Bible

    For your servant David's sake, don't turn away the face of your anointed one.

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    For thy servant David's sake turn not away the face of thine anointed.

    Clarke's Commentary on Psalms 132:10

    The face of thine anointed - David. Remember thy promises to him, that he may be restored to thee and to thy worship.

    Barnes' Notes on Psalms 132:10

    For thy servant David's sake - Because of the promise made to him; because of the zeal which he has shown in securing a place for the ark. Let it not be in vain that he has shown such a regard to the honor of God; let not the promises made to him fail. Such a prayer is proper now. There is nothing wrong in our beseeching God to carry out and accomplish the purposes cherished by his church for promoting the honor of his name; or for a child to pray that the purposes of a pious parent in regard to himself may not fail. It is an expression of nature - a desire that the labor and sacrifices of those who have gone before us should not be lost. This is the language of the author of the psalm, and of those for whom the psalm was composed. See Psalm 132:1. In view of all that David has done, do thou now show favor and mercy.

    Turn not away the face of thine anointed - As if in displeasure, or in forgetfulness. The word anointed would refer to one who was set apart as a king, a priest, or a prophet. See the notes at Matthew 1:1. The word would be applicable to David himself, as the anointed king; in a higher sense it is applicable to the Messiah, the Christ. The reference here is probably to David himself, as if a failure to carry out his purposes in regard to the sanctuary, or to fulfill the promises made to him, would be a turning away the face from him; would be a mark of the divine displeasure against him. The prayer is, that God would carry out those purposes as if his face was continually turned with benignity and favor toward David.