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Psalms 146:3

    Psalms 146:3 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    Put not your trust in princes, nor in the son of man, in whom there is no help.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    Put not your trust in princes, nor in the son of man, in whom there is no help.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    Put not your trust in princes, Nor in the son of man, in whom there is no help.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    Put not your faith in rulers, or in the son of man, in whom there is no salvation.

    Webster's Revision

    Put not your trust in princes, Nor in the son of man, in whom there is no help.

    World English Bible

    Don't put your trust in princes, each a son of man in whom there is no help.

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    Put not your trust in princes, nor in the son of man, in whom there is no help.

    Clarke's Commentary on Psalms 146:3

    Put not your trust in princes - This may refer, as has been stated above, to Cyrus, who had revoked his edict for the rebuilding of Jerusalem. Perhaps they had begun to suppose that they were about to owe their deliverance to the Persian king. God permitted this change in the disposition of the king, to teach them the vanity of confidence in men, and the necessity of trusting in himself.

    Barnes' Notes on Psalms 146:3

    Put not your trust in princes - Rely on God rather than on man, however exalted he may be. There is a work of protection and salvation which no man, however exalted he may be, can perform for you; a work which God alone, who is the Maker of all things, and who never dies, can accomplish. See the notes at Psalm 118:8-9. Compare also the notes at Isaiah 2:22 : "Cease ye from man, whose breath is in his nostrils, for wherein is he to be accounted of?"

    Nor in the son of man - Any son of man; any human being, no matter what his rank or power. The phrase is often used to denote man. See the notes at Psalm 8:4. The appellation "Son of man" was often applied by the Saviour to himself to express emphatically the idea that he was a man - that he had a human nature; that he was identified with the race; that he was a brother, a fellow-sufferer, a friend of man: that he was not a cold and abstract being so exalted that he could not feel or weep over the sins and woes of a fallen and suffering world. The language here, however, it is scarcely necessary to say, does not refer to him. It is right to put our trust in him; we have no other trust.

    In whom there is no help - Margin, salvation. So the Hebrew. The idea is, that man cannot save us. He cannot save himself; he cannot save others.