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Psalms 149:3

    Psalms 149:3 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    Let them praise his name in the dance: let them sing praises unto him with the timbrel and harp.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    Let them praise his name in the dance: let them sing praises to him with the tambourine and harp.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    Let them praise his name in the dance: Let them sing praises unto him with timbrel and harp.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    Let them give praise to his name in the dance: let them make melody to him with instruments of brass and corded instruments of music.

    Webster's Revision

    Let them praise his name in the dance: Let them sing praises unto him with timbrel and harp.

    World English Bible

    Let them praise his name in the dance! Let them sing praises to him with tambourine and harp!

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    Let them praise his name in the dance: let them sing praises unto him with the timbrel and harp.

    Definitions for Psalms 149:3

    Let - To hinder or obstruct.

    Clarke's Commentary on Psalms 149:3

    Let them praise his name in the dance - במחול bemachol, with the pipe, or some kind of wind music, classed here with תף toph, the tabor or drum, and כנור kinnor, the harp." מחול machol," says Parkhurst, "some fistular wind-instrument of music, with holes, as a flute, pipe, or fife, from חל chal, to make a hole or opening." I know no place in the Bible where מחול machol and מחלת machalath mean dance of any kind; they constantly signify some kind of pipe.

    Barnes' Notes on Psalms 149:3

    Let them praise his name in the dance - Margin, with the pipe. The Hebrew word here - מחול mâchôl - is rendered dancing in Psalm 30:11; dance, as here, Psalm 150:4 (where also the margin has pipe); Jeremiah 31:13; Lamentations 5:15; dances, Jeremiah 31:4. It does not elsewhere occur. On the verb חול chûl, see Psalm 10:5, note; Psalm 51:5, note. Here it cannot be improper to regard it as referring to that measured tread, or solemn movement which sometimes constituted a part of worship: 2 Samuel 6:14. Such a movement cannot be proved to be wrong in worship; whether it is wise or expedient is a different matter. Customs in worship change as the customs of a people change; and that might be very proper in one stage of society, or in one period of the world, which, though not in itself wrong, might be very unadvisable in another. There was much in the Hebrew mode of worship which cannot be transferred to the forms of Christian worship without an obvious incongruity and disadvantage; and because a thing has been done, and is not in itself wrong, we should not infer that it should always be done, or that it would be always best. If people like the Shakers dance in worship, they have an undoubted right to do so, and it may be the most edifying mode of worship for them with their low notions of religion; let not others ridicule them; nor let others go to see them as they would any other "outr'e" performance from idle curiosity. Such absurdities might soon die away if they were not kept alive by the notice which they attract, and by the foolish curiosity of wiser people. There are some things which are more certain to come to an end by neglect than they could by sober argument; some things which live merely because they are ridiculed, and because they who practice them are exalted into conspicuity by their own folly, and by the idea that they are martyrs.

    Let them sing praises unto him with the timbrel and harp - On these instruments, see the notes at Isaiah 5:12; notes at Job 21:12; notes at Psalm 68:25; notes at Psalm 81:2.