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Psalms 18:40

    Psalms 18:40 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    Thou hast also given me the necks of mine enemies; that I might destroy them that hate me.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    You have also given me the necks of my enemies; that I might destroy them that hate me.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    Thou hast also made mine enemies turn their backs unto me, That I might cut off them that hate me.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    By you their backs are turned in flight, so that my haters are cut off.

    Webster's Revision

    Thou hast also made mine enemies turn their backs unto me, That I might cut off them that hate me.

    World English Bible

    You have also made my enemies turn their backs to me, that I might cut off those who hate me.

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    Thou hast also made mine enemies turn their backs unto me, that I might cut off them that hate me.

    Clarke's Commentary on Psalms 18:40

    The necks of mine enemies - Thou hast made me a complete conqueror. Treading on the neck of an enemy was the triumph of the conqueror, and the utmost disgrace of the vanquished.

    Barnes' Notes on Psalms 18:40

    Thou hast also given me the necks of mine enemies - Their necks to tread upon, as the result of victory; or their necks to be subject to me, as the neck of the ox is to his owner. The phrase is sometimes used in this latter sense to denote subjection (compare Jeremiah 27:12); but it is more commonly, when applied to war, used in the former sense, as denoting complete triumph or conquest. It was not uncommon to trample on the necks of those who were overcome in battle. See Joshua 10:24; Ezekiel 21:2; Genesis 49:8. The word used here - ערף ‛ôreph - means properly neck, nape, the back of the neck; and hence, to give the neck means sometimes to turn the back, as in flight; and the phrase would admit of that meaning here. So Gesenius (Lexicon) understands it. So also DeWette: "Thou turnest my enemies to flight." It seems to me, however, that the more probable interpretation is that of complete subjection - as when the conqueror places his foot on the necks of his foes. This is confirmed by the next member of the sentence, where the psalmist speaks of the complete destruction of those who hated him.

    That I might destroy them that hate me - That have pursued and persecuted me in this manner. The idea is that of utterly overcoming them; of putting an end to their power, and to their ability to injure him.