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Psalms 19:10

    Psalms 19:10 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    More to be desired are they than gold, yea, than much fine gold: sweeter also than honey and the honeycomb.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    More to be desired are they than gold, yes, than much fine gold: sweeter also than honey and the honeycomb.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    More to be desired are they than gold, yea, than much fine gold; Sweeter also than honey and the droppings of the honeycomb.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    More to be desired are they than gold, even than much shining gold; sweeter than the dropping honey.

    Webster's Revision

    More to be desired are they than gold, yea, than much fine gold; Sweeter also than honey and the droppings of the honeycomb.

    World English Bible

    More to be desired are they than gold, yes, than much fine gold; sweeter also than honey and the extract of the honeycomb.

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    More to be desired are they than gold, yea, than much fine gold: sweeter also than honey and the honeycomb.

    Definitions for Psalms 19:10

    Yea - Yes; certainly.

    Clarke's Commentary on Psalms 19:10

    More to be desired are they than gold - This is strictly true; but who believes it? By most men gold is preferred both to God and his judgments; and they will barter every heavenly portion for gold and silver!

    Sweeter also than honey - To those whose mental taste is rectified, who have a spiritual discernment.

    Honey-comb - Honey is sweet; but honey just out of the comb has a sweetness, richness and flavour, far beyond what it has after it becomes exposed to the air. Only those who have eaten of honey from the comb can feel the force of the psalmist's comparison: it is better than gold, yea, than fine gold in the greatest quantity; it is sweeter than honey, yea, than honey from the comb.

    Barnes' Notes on Psalms 19:10

    More to be desired are they than gold - That is, his law; or, as in the preceding verse, his judgments. They are more valuable than gold; they are of such a nature that the soul should more desire to be in possession of them than to be in possession of gold, and should value them more. The psalmist here and in the following verses describes his estimate of the worth of revealed truth as he perceived it. In the previous verses he had shown its value in the abstract; he here speaks of his own feelings in regard to it, and shows that he esteems it more than he did the objects most prized and valued among men.

    Yea, than much fine gold - The word used here - פז pâz - means properly that which is purified or pure, and thus becomes an epithet of gold, particularly of gold that is purified. It is rendered fine gold here, as in Psalm 119:127; Proverbs 8:19; Sol 5:11, Sol 5:15; Isaiah 13:12; Lamentations 4:2; and pure gold in Psalm 21:3. The word does not occur elsewhere. Gold is an article of principal value among men; and the object here is to show that to a pious mind the revealed truth of God is esteemed to be the most valuable of all things - a treasure above all which men can accumulate, and all which men can prize. Every truly pious heart will respond to the sentiment expressed here.

    Sweeter also than honey - Honey, the sweetest of all substances, and regarded as an article of luxury, or as most grateful to the taste. It entered largely into the food of the inhabitants of Palestine, as it does now in Switzerland and in some parts of Africa. The idea is that the truth of God, as revealed, is more grateful to the heart, or affords more pleasure to the soul, than that which is esteemed as the highest luxury to the palate. The meaning is, that it is loved; it is pleasant; it is agreeable; it is not regarded merely as necessary, and admitted to the soul because it is needful, as medicine is, but it is received into the soul because it is delighted in, or is more agreeable and pleasant than the most luscious article of food is to the taste. To this, also, the heart of every one who "has tasted the good word of God" will respond.

    And the honeycomb - Margin, dropping of honeycombs. So the Hebrew. The allusion is to honey that drops from the combs, and therefore the most pure honey. That which is pressed from the combs will have almost inevitably a mixture of bee-bread and of the combs themselves. That which naturally flows from the comb will be pure.