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Psalms 2:4

    Psalms 2:4 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    He that sitteth in the heavens shall laugh: the LORD shall have them in derision.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    He that sits in the heavens shall laugh: the LORD shall have them in derision.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    He that sitteth in the heavens will laugh: The Lord will have them in derision.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    Then he whose seat is in the heavens will be laughing: the Lord will make sport of them.

    Webster's Revision

    He that sitteth in the heavens will laugh: The Lord will have them in derision.

    World English Bible

    He who sits in the heavens will laugh. The Lord will have them in derision.

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    He that sitteth in the heavens shall laugh: the Lord shall have them in derision.

    Clarke's Commentary on Psalms 2:4

    He that sitteth in the heavens - Whose kingdom ruleth over all, and is above all might and power, human and diabolical. Shall laugh. Words spoken after the manner of men; shall utterly contemn their puny efforts; shall beat down their pride, assuage their malice, and confound their devices.

    Barnes' Notes on Psalms 2:4

    He that sitteth in the heavens - God, represented as having his home, his seat, his throne in heaven, and thence administering the affairs of the world. This verse commences the second strophe or stanza of the psalm; and this strophe Psalm 2:4-6 corresponds with the first Psalm 2:1-3 in its structure. The former describes the feelings and purposes of those who would cast off the government of God; this describes the feelings and purposes of God in the same order, for in each case the psalmist describes what is done, and then what is said: the nations rage tumultuously Psalm 2:1-2, and then say Psalm 2:3, "Let us break their bands." God sits calmly in the heavens, smiling on their vain attempts Psalm 2:4, and then solemnly declares Psalm 2:5-6 that, in spite of all their opposition, he "has set his King upon his holy hill of Zion." There is much sublimity in this description. While men rage and are tumultuous in opposing his plans, he sits calm and undisturbed in his own heaven. Compare the notes at the similar place in Isaiah 18:4.

    Shall laugh - Will smile at their vain attempts; will not be disturbed or agitated by their efforts; will go calmly on in the execution of his purposes. Compare as above Isaiah 18:4. See also Proverbs 1:26; Psalm 37:13; Psalm 59:8. This is, of course, to be regarded as spoken after the manner of men, and it means that God will go steadily forward in the accomplishment of his purposes. There is included also the idea that he will look with contempt on their vain and futile efforts.

    The Lord shall have them in derision - The same idea is expressed here in a varied form, as is the custom in parallelism in Hebrew poetry. The Hebrew word לעג lâ‛ag, means properly to stammer; then to speak in a barbarous or foreign tongue; then to mock or deride, by imitating the stammering voice of anyone. Gesenius, Lexicon Here it is spoken of God, and, of course, is not to be understood literally, anymore than when eyes, and hands, and feet are spoken of as pertaining to him. The meaning is, that there is a result in the case, in the Divine Mind, as if he mocked or derided the vain attempts of men; that is, he goes calmly forward in the execution of his own purposes, and he looks upon and regards their efforts as vain, as we do the efforts of others when we mock or deride them. The truth taught in this verse is, that God will carry forward his own plans in spite of all the attempts of men to thwart them. This general truth may lie stated in two forms:

    (1) He sits undisturbed and unmoved in heaven while men rage against him, and while they combine to cast off his authority.

    (2) He carries forward his own plans in spite of them. This he does:

    (a) directly, accomplishing his schemes without regard to their attempts; and

    (b) by making their purposes tributary to his own, so making them the instruments in carrying out his own plans. Compare Acts 4:28.