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Psalms 20:1

    Psalms 20:1 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    The LORD hear thee in the day of trouble; the name of the God of Jacob defend thee;

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    The LORD hear you in the day of trouble; the name of the God of Jacob defend you;

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    Jehovah answer thee in the day of trouble; The name of the God of Jacob set thee up on high;

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    <To the chief music-maker. A Psalm. Of David.> May the Lord give ear to you in the day of trouble; may you be placed on high by the name of the God of Jacob;

    Webster's Revision

    Jehovah answer thee in the day of trouble; The name of the God of Jacob set thee up on high;

    World English Bible

    May Yahweh answer you in the day of trouble. May the name of the God of Jacob set you up on high,

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    For the Chief Musician. A Psalm of David. The LORD answer thee in the day of trouble; the name of the God of Jacob set thee up on high;

    Clarke's Commentary on Psalms 20:1

    The Lord hear thee - David had already offered the sacrifice and prayed. The people implore God to succor him in the day of trouble; of both personal and national danger.

    The name of the God of Jacob - This refers to Jacob's wrestling with the Angel; Genesis 32:24 (note), etc. And who was this Angel? Evidently none other than the Angel of the Covenant, the Lord Jesus, in whom was the name of God, the fullness of the Godhead bodily. He was the God of Jacob, who blessed Jacob, and gave him a new name and a new nature. See the notes on the above place in Genesis.

    Barnes' Notes on Psalms 20:1

    The Lord hear thee in the day of trouble - According to the view expressed in the introduction to the psalm, this is the language of the people praying for their king, or expressing the hope that he would be delivered from trouble, and would be successful in what he had undertaken, in the prosecution of a war apparently of defense. The word" trouble" here used would seem to imply that he was beset with difficulties and dangers; perhaps, that he was surrounded by foes. It seems that he was going forth to war to deliver his country from trouble, having offered sacrifices and prayers Psalm 20:3 for the purpose of securing the divine favor on the expedition. The point or the moment of the psalm is when those sacrifices had been offered, and when he was about to embark on his enterprise. At that moment the people lift up the voice of sympathy and of encouragement, and pray that those sacrifices might be accepted, and that he might find the deliverance which he had desired.

    The name of the God of Jacob - The word name is often put in the Scriptures for the person himself; and hence, this is equivalent to saying, "May the God of Jacob defend thee." See Psalm 5:11; Psalm 9:10; Psalm 44:5; Psalm 54:1; Exodus 23:21. Jacob was the one of the patriarchs from whom, after his other name, the Hebrew people derived their name Israel, and the word seems here to be used with reference to the people rather than to the ancestor. Compare Isaiah 44:2. The God of Jacob, or the God of Israel, would be synonymous terms, and either would denote that he was the Protector of the nation. As such he is invoked here; and the prayer is, that the Great Protector of the Hebrew people would now defend the king in the dangers which beset him, and in the enterprise which he had undertaken.

    Defend thee - Margin, as in Hebrew, set thee on a high place. The word means the same as defend him, for the idea is that of being set on a high place, a tower, a mountain, a lofty rock, where his enemies could not reach or assail him.

    Wesley's Notes on Psalms 20:1

    20:1 God of Jacob - God had made a covenant with Jacob and his posterity.