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Psalms 22:1

    Psalms 22:1 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    My God, my God, why hast thou forsaken me? why art thou so far from helping me, and from the words of my roaring?

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    My God, my God, why have you forsaken me? why are you so far from helping me, and from the words of my roaring?

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    My God, my God, why hast thou forsaken me? Why art thou so far from helping me, and from the words of my groaning?

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    <To the chief music-maker on Aijeleth-hash-shahar. A Psalm. Of David.> My God, my God, why are you turned away from me? why are you so far from helping me, and from the words of my crying?

    Webster's Revision

    My God, my God, why hast thou forsaken me? Why art thou so far from helping me, and from the words of my groaning?

    World English Bible

    My God, my God, why have you forsaken me? Why are you so far from helping me, and from the words of my groaning?

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    For the Chief Musician; set to Aijeleth hash-Shahar. A Psalm of David. My God, my God, why hast thou forsaken me? why art thou so far from helping me, and from the words of my roaring?

    Definitions for Psalms 22:1

    Art - "Are"; second person singular.
    Forsaken - To leave in an abandoned condition.

    Clarke's Commentary on Psalms 22:1

    My God, my God, why hast thou forsaken me? - Show me the cause why thou hast abandoned me to my enemies; and why thou seemest to disregard my prayers and cries? For a full illustration of this passage, I beg the reader to refer to my note on Matthew 27:46.

    The words of my roaring? - שאגתי shaagathi, The Vulgate, Septuagint, Syriac, Ethiopic, and Arabic, with the Anglo-Saxon, make use of terms which may be thus translated: "My sins (or foolishness) are the cause why deliverance is so far from me." It appears that these versions have read שגגתי shegagathi, "my sin of ignorance," instead of שאגתי shaagathi, "my roaring:" but no MS. extant supports this reading.

    Barnes' Notes on Psalms 22:1

    According to this, each strophe, as Hengstenberg remarks, would consist of ten verses - with an intermediate verse between the 10th and the 12th Psalm 22:11 connecting the first and second parts. Prof. Alexander supposes that Psalm 22:21 is a connecting link also between the second and third parts.

    This division, however, seems fanciful and arbitrary; and it will present a more simple and clear view of the psalm to regard it as embracing two main things: I. The condition of the sufferer; and II. His consolations or supports in his travels.

    I. The condition of the sufferer. This consists of two parts:

    (1) His sufferings as derived from God, or as they spring from God;

    (2) as they are derived from men, or as they spring from the treatment which he receives from men.

    (1) As they are derived from God, Psalm 22:1-2.

    (a) He is forsaken of God, Psalm 22:1.

    (b) He cries to him day and night (or continually), and receives no answer, Psalm 22:2.

    His prayer seems not to be heard, and he is left to suffer apparently unpitied and alone.

    (2) his sufferings as derived front men, as produced by the treatment which he received from men.

    Here there are "five" specifications; "five" sources of his affliction and sorrow.

    "First." He was despised, reproached, derided by them in the midst of his other sufferings, Psalm 22:6-8; especially his piety, or confidence in God was ridiculed, for it now seemed as if God had abandoned him.

    "Second." His enemies were fierce and ravenous as strong bulls of Bashan, or as a ravening and roaring lion, Psalm 22:12-13.

    "Third." His sufferings were intense, so that his whole frame was relaxed and prostrated and crushed; he seemed to be poured out like water, and all his bones were out of joint; his heart was melted like wax; his strength was dried up like a potsherd; his tongue clave to his jaws, and he was brought into the dust of death, Psalm 22:14-15.

    continued...

    Wesley's Notes on Psalms 22:1

    22:1 My God - Who art my friend and father, though now thou frownest upon me. The repetition denotes, the depth of his distress, which made him cry so earnestly. Forsaken - Withdrawn the light of thy countenance, the supports and comforts of thy spirit, and filled me with the terrors of thy wrath: this was in part verified in David, but much more fully in Christ. Roaring - My out - cries forced from me, by my miseries.