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Psalms 22:4

    Psalms 22:4 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    Our fathers trusted in thee: they trusted, and thou didst deliver them.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    Our fathers trusted in you: they trusted, and you did deliver them.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    Our fathers trusted in thee: They trusted, and thou didst deliver them.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    Our fathers had faith in you: they had faith and you were their saviour.

    Webster's Revision

    Our fathers trusted in thee: They trusted, and thou didst deliver them.

    World English Bible

    Our fathers trusted in you. They trusted, and you delivered them.

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    Our fathers trusted in thee: they trusted, and thou didst deliver them.

    Clarke's Commentary on Psalms 22:4

    Our fathers trusted in thee - David is supposed to have been, at the time of composing this Psalm, at Mahanaim, where Jacob was once in such great distress; where he wrestled with the angel, and was so signally blessed. David might well allude to this circumstance in order to strengthen his faith in God. I am now in the place where God so signally blessed the head and father of our tribes. I wrestle with God, as he did; may I not expect similar success?

    Barnes' Notes on Psalms 22:4

    Our fathers trusted in thee - This is a plea of the sufferer as drawn from the character which God had manifested in former times. The argument is, that he had interposed in those times when his people in trouble had called upon him; and he now pleads with God that he would manifest himself to him in the same way. The argument derives additional force also from the idea that he who now pleads was descended from them, or was of the same nation and people, and that he might call them his ancestors. As applicable to the Redeemer, the argument is that he was descended from those holy and suffering men who had trusted in God, and in whose behalf God had so often interposed. He identifies himself with that people; he regards himself as one of their number; and he makes mention of God's merciful interposition in their behalf, and of the fact that he had not forsaken them in their troubles, as a reason why he should now interpose in his behalf and save him. As applicable to others, it is an argument which the people of God may always use in their trials - that God has thus interposed in behalf of his people of former times who trusted in him, and who called upon him. God is always the same. We may strengthen our faith in our trials by the assurance that he never changes; and, in pleading with him, we may urge it as an argument that he has often interposed when the tried and the afflicted of his people have called upon him.

    They trusted, and thou didst deliver them - They confided in thee; they called on thee; thou didst not spurn their prayer; thou didst not forsake them.