Search the Bible
* powered by Bible Study Tools

Psalms 25:16

    Psalms 25:16 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    Turn thee unto me, and have mercy upon me; for I am desolate and afflicted.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    Turn you to me, and have mercy on me; for I am desolate and afflicted.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    Turn thee unto me, and have mercy upon me; For I am desolate and afflicted.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    Be turned to me, and have mercy on me; for I am troubled and have no helper.

    Webster's Revision

    Turn thee unto me, and have mercy upon me; For I am desolate and afflicted.

    World English Bible

    Turn to me, and have mercy on me, for I am desolate and afflicted.

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    Turn thee unto me, and have mercy upon me; for I am desolate and afflicted.

    Clarke's Commentary on Psalms 25:16

    Turn thee unto me - Probably the prayer of the poor captives in Bablyon, which is continued through this and the remaining verses.

    Barnes' Notes on Psalms 25:16

    Turn thee unto me - Rather, the Hebrew means: "look upon me." The idea, however, is that the face of God was, as it were, turned in another direction, or that He was not attentive to him; and he prays that He would turn and behold him; that He would see him in his trouble.

    And have mercy upon me - The psalmist seems to have felt that if God would look upon him he would pity him. He would see his case to be so sad that He would show him compassion - as, when we see an object of distress, "the eye affects the heart."

    For I am desolate - The word here rendered "desolate" - יחיד yâchı̂yd - means properly "one alone, only;" and then, one who "is alone," or who is solitary, forsaken, wretched. There is no deeper sadness that ever comes over the mind than the idea that we are alone in the world; that we do not have a friend; that no one cares for us; that no one is concerned about anything that might happen to us; that no one would care if we were to die; that no one would shed a tear over our grave.

    And afflicted - In what way we do not know. David, however, was very often in circumstances when he could use this language. The other parts of the psalm show that the "affliction" to which he here refers was that which arose from the recollection of the sins of his early life, and from the designs and purposes of his enemies.