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Psalms 25:17

    Psalms 25:17 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    The troubles of my heart are enlarged: O bring thou me out of my distresses.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    The troubles of my heart are enlarged: O bring you me out of my distresses.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    The troubles of my heart are enlarged: Oh bring thou me out of my distresses.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    The troubles of my heart are increased: O take me out of my sorrows.

    Webster's Revision

    The troubles of my heart are enlarged: Oh bring thou me out of my distresses.

    World English Bible

    The troubles of my heart are enlarged. Oh bring me out of my distresses.

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    The troubles of my heart are enlarged: O bring thou me out of my distresses.

    Clarke's Commentary on Psalms 25:17

    The troubles of may heart are enlarged - The evils of our captive state, instead of lessening, seem to multiply, and each to be extended.

    Barnes' Notes on Psalms 25:17

    The troubles of my heart - The sorrows which spring upon the heart - particularly from the recollections of sin.

    Are enlarged - Have become great. They increased the more he reflected on the sins of his life.

    O bring thou me out of my distresses - Alike from my sins, and from the dangers which surround me. These two things, external trouble and the inward consciousness of guilt, are not infrequently combined. Outward trouble has a tendency to bring up the remembrance of past transgressions, and to suggest the inquiry whether the affliction is not a divine visitation for sin. Any one source of sorrow may draw along numerous others in its train. The laws of association are such that when the mind rests on one source of joy, and is made cheerful by that, numerous other blessings will be suggested to increase the joy; and when one great sorrow has taken possession of the soul, all the lesser sorrows of the past life cluster around it, so that we seem to ourselves to be wholly abandoned by God and by man.