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Psalms 25:6

    Psalms 25:6 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    Remember, O LORD, thy tender mercies and thy lovingkindnesses; for they have been ever of old.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    Remember, O LORD, your tender mercies and your loving kindnesses; for they have been ever of old.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    Remember, O Jehovah, thy tender mercies and thy lovingkindness; For they have been ever of old.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    O Lord, keep in mind your pity and your mercies; for they have been from the earliest times.

    Webster's Revision

    Remember, O Jehovah, thy tender mercies and thy lovingkindness; For they have been ever of old.

    World English Bible

    Yahweh, remember your tender mercies and your loving kindness, for they are from old times.

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    Remember, O LORD, thy tender mercies and thy lovingkindnesses; for they have been ever of old.

    Clarke's Commentary on Psalms 25:6

    Remember, O Lord, thy tender mercies, and thy loving-kindness - The word רחמים rachamim, means the commiseration that a man feels in his bowels at the sight of distress. The second word, חסדים chasadim, signifies those kindnesses which are the offspring of a profusion of benevolence.

    They have been ever of old - Thou wert ever wont to display thyself as a ceaseless fountain of good to all thy creatures.

    Barnes' Notes on Psalms 25:6

    Remember, O Lord - That is, In thy future treatment of me, bring to remembrance what thou hast done, and treat me in the same manner still. The language is that of one who felt that God had always been kind and gracious, and who asked for the future a continuance of the favors of the past. If we would recall, the goodness of God in the past, we should find enough to lay the foundation of prayer in reference to that which is to come. If we saw and fully understood all that has happened to us, we would need to offer no other prayer than that God might deal with us in the future as He has done in the past.

    Thy tender mercies - Margin, as in Hebrew: "thy bowels." The Hebrew word means the "inner parts" regarded by the Hebrews as the seat of the affections. See the notes at Isaiah 16:11.

    And thy loving-kindnesses - Thy tokens of favor; thy acts of mercy and compassion.

    For they have been ever of old - "For from eternity are they." The language is that of a heart deeply impressed with a sense of the goodness God. In looking over his own life, the author of the psalm saw that the mercies of God had been unceasing and constant toward him from his earliest years. In words expressive of warm love and gratitude, therefore, he says that those acts of mercy had never failed - had been from eternity. His thoughts rise from the acts of God toward himself to the character of God, and to His attributes of mercy and love; and his heart is full of the idea that God is "always" good; that it belongs to His very nature to do good.