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Psalms 27:13

    Psalms 27:13 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    I had fainted, unless I had believed to see the goodness of the LORD in the land of the living.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    I had fainted, unless I had believed to see the goodness of the LORD in the land of the living.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    I had fainted , unless I had believed to see the goodness of Jehovah In the land of the living.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    I had almost given up my hope of seeing the blessing of the Lord in the land of the living.

    Webster's Revision

    I had fainted , unless I had believed to see the goodness of Jehovah In the land of the living.

    World English Bible

    I am still confident of this: I will see the goodness of Yahweh in the land of the living.

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    I had fainted, unless I had believed to see the goodness of the LORD in the land of the living.

    Clarke's Commentary on Psalms 27:13

    I had fainted, unless I had believed - The words in italics are supplied by our translators; but, far from being necessary, they injure the sense. Throw out the words I had fainted, and leave a break after the verse, and the elegant figure of the psalmist will be preserved: "Unless I had believed to see the goodness of the Lord in the land of the living" - What! what, alas! should have become of me!

    Dr. Hammond has observed that there is a remarkable elegance in the original, which, by the use of the beautiful figure aposiopesis, makes an abrupt breaking off in the midst of a speech. He compares it to the speech of Neptune to the winds that had raised the tempest to drown the fleet of Aeneas - Aeneid. lib. i., ver. 131.

    Eurum ad se zephyrumque vocat: dehinc talia fatur;

    Tantane vos generis tenuit fiducia vestri?

    Jam coelum terramque, meo sine numine, venti,

    Miscere, et tantas audetis tollere moles?

    Quos ego-sed motos praestat componere fluctus.

    To Eurus and the western blast he cried,

    Does your high birth inspire this boundless pride?

    Audacious winds! without a power from me,

    To raise at will such mountains on the sea?

    Thus to confound heaven, earth, the air, and main;

    Whom I-- but, first, I'll calm the waves again.

    Pitts.

    Barnes' Notes on Psalms 27:13

    I had fainted, unless I had believed - The words "I had fainted" are supplied by the translators, but they undoubtedly express the true sense of the passage. The psalmist refers to the state of mind produced by the efforts of his enemies to destroy him, as mentioned in Psalm 27:12. So numerous, mighty, and formidable were they, that he says his only support was his faith in God; his belief that he would yet be permitted to see the goodness of God upon the earth. In this time of perplexity and trial he had confidence in God, and believed that He would uphold him, and would permit him to see the evidences of His goodness and mercy while yet on the earth. What was the ground of this confidence he does not say, but he had the fullest belief that this would be so. He may have had some special assurance of it, or he may have had a deep internal conviction of it, sufficient to calm his mind; but whatever was the source of this confidence it was that which sustained him. A similar state of feeling is indicated in the remarkable passage in Job, Job 19:25-27. See the notes at that passage.

    To see the goodness of the Lord in the land of the living - That is, that I should "live," and yet see and enjoy the tokens of the divine favor here upon the earth.

    Wesley's Notes on Psalms 27:13

    27:13 The living - David was thus earnestly desirous of this mercy in this life, not because he placed his portion in these things; but because the truth and glory of God, were highly concerned in making good the promise of the kingdom to him.