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Psalms 3:1

    Psalms 3:1 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    Lord, how are they increased that trouble me! many are they that rise up against me.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    Lord, how are they increased that trouble me! many are they that rise up against me.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    Jehovah, how are mine adversaries increased! Many are they that rise up against me.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    <A Psalm. Of David. When he went in flight from Absalom his son.> Lord, how greatly are they increased who make attacks on me! in great numbers they come against me.

    Webster's Revision

    Jehovah, how are mine adversaries increased! Many are they that rise up against me.

    World English Bible

    Yahweh, how my adversaries have increased! Many are those who rise up against me.

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    A Psalm of David, when he fled from Absalom his son. LORD, how are mine adversaries increased! many are they that rise up against me.

    Clarke's Commentary on Psalms 3:1

    Lord, how are they increased that trouble me? - We are told that the hearts of all Israel went after Absalom, 2 Samuel 15:13; and David is astonished to find such a sudden and general revolt. Not only the common people, but his counsellors also, and many of his chief captains. How publicly does God take vengeance for the sins which David committed so privately! In the horrible rebellion of Absalom we see the adultery of Bath-sheba, and the murder of Uriah. Now the words of Nathan begin to be fulfilled: "The sword shall not depart from thy house."

    Barnes' Notes on Psalms 3:1

    A Psalm of David - literally, belonging to David; that is, belonging to him as the author. This is marked in the Hebrew as the first verse, and so in the Syriac version, the Latin Vulgate, and the Septuagint, making in the Hebrew, and in each of these versions, nine verses in the psalm instead of eight, as in our translation. This may have been prefixed to the psalm by the author himself, for it was not uncommon in ancient times for an author to prefix his name to his own composition, as is commonly done by the apostle Paul in his epistles. It is not absolutely certain, however, that this was done in the Psalms by the authors themselves, but it may have been done by him who collected and arranged the Psalms, indicating the prevalent belief in regard to the authorship, and under the Spirit of inspiration.

    When he fled - On the occasion of his fleeing. That is, it was composed at that time, or was subsequently composed in remembrance of it. See Introduction, Section 2.

    From Absalom his son - See the introduction, Section 2.

    Lord, how are they increased - How are they multiplied; or, how numerous they are. Perhaps the idea is, that at first they seemed to be comparatively few in number, but had now so multiplied as to endanger his crown and life. This is an appropriate expression on the supposition that it refers to Absalom. At first the number of those who adhered to Absalom was not so great as to excite much alarm; but by the arts of a demagogue, by complaining of the government, by saying that if he were made a judge in tim land, every man would have justice done him 2 Samuel 15:4-5, he won the hearts of the people, and gathered so many under his standard as to make it necessary that the king should flee from Jerusalem to a place of safety.

    That trouble me - literally, my enemies. The allusion is to those who were now enlisted under Absalom, and who were engaged in endeavoring to overthrow the government.

    Many are they that rise up against me - That is, that have become my enemies.