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Psalms 3:4

    Psalms 3:4 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    I cried unto the LORD with my voice, and he heard me out of his holy hill. Selah.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    I cried to the LORD with my voice, and he heard me out of his holy hill. Selah.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    I cry unto Jehovah with my voice, And he answereth me out of his holy hill. Selah

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    I send up a cry to the Lord with my voice, and he gives me an answer from his holy hill. (Selah.)

    Webster's Revision

    I cry unto Jehovah with my voice, And he answereth me out of his holy hill. Selah

    World English Bible

    I cry to Yahweh with my voice, and he answers me out of his holy hill. Selah.

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    I cry unto the LORD with my voice, and he answereth me out of his holy hill. Selah

    Clarke's Commentary on Psalms 3:4

    I cried unto the Lord with my voice - He was exposed to much danger, and therefore he had need of fervor.

    He heard me - Notwithstanding my enemies said, and my friends feared, that there was no help for me in my God; yet he heard me out of his holy hill. Selah: mark this, and take encouragement from it. God never forsakes those who trust in him. He never shuts out the prayer of the distressed.

    Barnes' Notes on Psalms 3:4

    I cried unto the Lord - That is, in these troubles, as he had always done in affliction. The form of the verb here is future - "I will cry" or call unto the Lord; probably, however, designed to state a general habit with him, that when troubles came he always called on the Lord. He speaks now of himself as if in the midst of the trouble; gives utterance to the feeling which he has always had in his sorrows; and says, "I will call upon the Lord," thus declaring his purpose to make his appeal confidently to him. Thus, the language is not so much retrospective as it is indicative of the uniform state of his mind in the midst of afflictions.

    With my voice - Not merely mentally, but he gave utterance to the deep anguish of his soul in words. So the Saviour did in the garden of Gethsemane Matthew 26:39; and so, perhaps, most persons do in deep affliction. It is natural then to cry out for help; and besides the fact that we may hope that any prayer then, though mental only, would bring relief by being answered, there is a measure of relief found by the very act of giving utterance or vent to the deep and, as it were, pent-up feelings of the soul. In calmer times we are satisfied with unuttered aspirations, with gentle ejaculations, with sweet mental communion with God; in overwhelming trials we give utterance to our feelings in the earnest language of pleading.

    And he heard me - Or, "then he hears me;" that is, when I call. The psalmist refers to what he had constantly found to be true, that God was a hearer of prayer.

    Out of his holy hill - Zion. See the notes at Psalm 2:6. That was the place to which David had removed the ark, and which was regarded, therefore, as the special dwelling-place of the Most High. To him, as dwelling in Zion, prayer was accustomed to be offered, and there he was accustomed to answer prayer. To this fact David here refers as one that had been illustrated in his former days. To that God who had thus answered him he felt that he might confidently appeal now.

    Selah - Indicating another strophe or musical pause. See the notes at Psalm 3:2.

    Wesley's Notes on Psalms 3:4

    3:4 His hill - Out of heaven, so called, Psal 15:1.