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Psalms 30:8

    Psalms 30:8 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    I cried to thee, O LORD; and unto the LORD I made supplication.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    I cried to you, O LORD; and to the LORD I made supplication.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    I cried to thee, O Jehovah; And unto Jehovah I made supplication:

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    My voice went up to you, O Lord; I made my prayer to the Lord.

    Webster's Revision

    I cried to thee, O Jehovah; And unto Jehovah I made supplication:

    World English Bible

    I cried to you, Yahweh. To Yahweh I made supplication:

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    I cried to thee, O LORD; and unto the LORD I made supplication:

    Definitions for Psalms 30:8

    Supplication - Petition; an expression of need.

    Clarke's Commentary on Psalms 30:8

    I cried to thee, O Lord - I found no help but in him against whom I had sinned. See his confession and prayer, 2 Samuel 24:17 (note).

    Made supplication - Continued to urge my suit; was instant in prayer.

    Barnes' Notes on Psalms 30:8

    I cried to thee, O Lord - That is, when those reverses came, and when that on which I had so confidently relied was taken away, I called upon the Lord; I uttered an earnest cry for aid. The prayer which he uttered on the occasion is specified in the following verses. The idea here is, that he was not driven from God by these reverses, but TO him. He felt that his reliance on those things in which he had put his trust was vain, and he now came to God, the true Source of strength, and sought His protection and favor. This was doubtless the design of the reverses which God had brought upon him; and this will always be the effect of the reverses that come upon good men. When they have placed undue reliance upon wealth, or health, or friends, and when these are taken away, the effect will be to lead them to God in earnest prayer. God designs to bring them back, and they do come back to him. Afflictions are always, sooner or later, effectual in bringing good men back to God. The sinner is often driven from God by trial; the good man is brought back to find his strength and comfort in God. The one complains, and murmurs, and is wretched; the other prays, and submits, and is made more happy than he was in the days of his prosperity.