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Psalms 31:18

    Psalms 31:18 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    Let the lying lips be put to silence; which speak grievous things proudly and contemptuously against the righteous.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    Let the lying lips be put to silence; which speak grievous things proudly and contemptuously against the righteous.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    Let the lying lips be dumb, Which speak against the righteous insolently, With pride and contempt.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    Let the false lips be shut, which say evil against the upright, looking down on him in their pride.

    Webster's Revision

    Let the lying lips be dumb, Which speak against the righteous insolently, With pride and contempt.

    World English Bible

    Let the lying lips be mute, which speak against the righteous insolently, with pride and contempt.

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    Let the lying lips be dumb; which speak against the righteous insolently, with pride and contempt.

    Definitions for Psalms 31:18

    Let - To hinder or obstruct.

    Clarke's Commentary on Psalms 31:18

    Let the lying lips be put to silence - As to my enemies, persecutors, and slanderers, abate their pride, assuage their malice, and confound their devices. See Jeremiah 18:18.

    Barnes' Notes on Psalms 31:18

    Let the lying lips be put to silence - See the notes at Psalm 12:2-3. The lips which speak lies. The reference here is especially to those who had spoken in this manner against the psalmist himself, though he makes the language general, or prays in general that God would silence all liars: a prayer certainly in which all persons may properly join.

    Which speak grievous things - Margin, "a hard thing." The Hebrew word - עתק ‛âthâq - means "bold, impudent, wicked." Gesenius, Lexicon. The phrase here means, therefore, to speak wickedly, or to speak in a bold, reckless, impudent manner; that is, without regard to the truth of what is said.

    Proudly and contemptuously - Hebrew, in pride and contempt: that is, in a manner which shows that they are proud of themselves and despise others. Slander always perhaps implies this. People are secretly proud of themselves; or they "desire" to cherish an exalted opinion of themselves, and to have others entertain the same opinion of them; and hence, if they cannot exalt themselves by their own merit, as they wish, they endeavor to humble others below their real merit, and to a level lower than themselves, by detraction.