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Psalms 35:16

    Psalms 35:16 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    With hypocritical mockers in feasts, they gnashed upon me with their teeth.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    With hypocritical mockers in feasts, they gnashed on me with their teeth.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    Like the profane mockers in feasts, They gnashed upon me with their teeth.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    Like men of deceit they put me to shame; the voice of their wrath was loud against me.

    Webster's Revision

    Like the profane mockers in feasts, They gnashed upon me with their teeth.

    World English Bible

    Like the profane mockers in feasts, they gnashed their teeth at me.

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    Like the profane mockers in feasts, they gnashed upon me with their teeth.

    Clarke's Commentary on Psalms 35:16

    With hypocritical mockers in feasts - These verses seem to be prophetic of the treatment of Christ. They did tear me, and I knew it not. They blindfolded and buffeted him; they placed him in such circumstances as not to be able to discern who insulted him, except by a supernatural knowledge. With hypocritical mockers in feasts may also relate prophetically to our Lord's sufferings. Herod clothed him in a purple robe, put a reed in his hand for a scepter, bowed the knee before him, and set him at naught. Here their hypocritical conduct (pretending one thing while they meant another) was manifest, and possibly; this occurred at one of Herod's feasts.

    Barnes' Notes on Psalms 35:16

    With hypocritical mockers in feasts - The word rendered hypocritical here - חנף chânêph - properly means people "profane, impious, abandoned." It refers to such persons as are commonly found in scenes of revelry. The words rendered "mockers at feasts," it is scarcely possible to render literally. The word translated, "mockers," - לעג lâ‛êg - means properly one who stammers, or who speaks a foreign language; then, a jester, mocker, buffoon. The word rendered "feasts" - מעוג mâ‛ôg - means "a cake of bread;" and the whole phrase would denote "cake-jesters;" "table-buffoons" - those, perhaps, who act the part of jesters at the tables of the rich for the sake of good eating. "Gesenius." - The meaning is, that he was exposed to the ribaldry or jesting of that low class of people; that those with whom he had formerly been on friendly terms, and whom he had admitted to his own table, and for whom he had wept in their troubles, now drew around themselves that low and common class of parasites and buffoons for the purpose of ridiculing or deriding him.

    They gnashed upon me with their teeth - The act of gnashing with the teeth is expressive of anger or wrath. See the notes at Job 16:9; compare Matthew 8:12; Matthew 13:42, Matthew 13:50; Matthew 22:13; Matthew 24:51; Matthew 25:30; Luke 13:28. The meaning here is that they connected the expressions of auger or wrath with those of derision and scorn. The one is commonly not far from the other.

    Wesley's Notes on Psalms 35:16

    35:16 Mockers - They made themselves buffoons and jesters, and accustomed themselves to mock and deride David, that thereby they might gain admittance to the tables of great men, which was all they sought for.