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Psalms 38:15

    Psalms 38:15 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    For in thee, O LORD, do I hope: thou wilt hear, O Lord my God.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    For in you, O LORD, do I hope: you will hear, O Lord my God.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    For in thee, O Jehovah, do I hope: Thou wilt answer, O Lord my God.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    In you, O Lord, is my hope: you will give me an answer, O Lord, my God.

    Webster's Revision

    For in thee, O Jehovah, do I hope: Thou wilt answer, O Lord my God.

    World English Bible

    For in you, Yahweh, do I hope. You will answer, Lord my God.

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    For in thee, O LORD, do I hope: thou wilt answer, O Lord my God.

    Clarke's Commentary on Psalms 38:15

    In thee, O Lord, do I hope - I have no helper but thee.

    Thou wilt hear, O Lord my God - Thou art eternal in thy compassions, and wilt hear the prayer of a penitent soul. In the printed copies of the Hebrew text we have אדני אלהי Adonai Elohai, Lord my God; but, instead of אדני Adonai, one hundred and two of Kennicott's and De Rossi's MSS. read יהוה Yehovah. As this word is never pronounced by the Jews, and they consider it dreadfully sacred, in reading, wherever it occurs, they pronounce אדני Adonai; and we may well suppose that Jewish scribes, in writing out copies of the sacred Scriptures, would as naturally write Adonai for Yehovah, as they would in reading supply the former for the latter.

    Barnes' Notes on Psalms 38:15

    For in thee, O Lord, do I hope - This shows the reason or ground of his patience. He committed his whole cause to God. He believed that God would take care of his reputation, and that he would vindicate him. See Psalm 37:5-6. He had no doubt that He would protect his character, and that, notwithstanding the reproaches of his enemies, his true character would at last be made to shine forth, so that all men would see that he had been unjustly aspersed. The exact idea here is expressed, and the sentiment was beautifully and perfectly illustrated, in what is said of the Lord Jesus: "Who, when he was reviled, reviled not again; when he suffered, he threatened not; but committed himself to him that judgeth righteously," 1 Peter 2:23.

    Thou wilt hear, O Lord my God - Margin, as in Hebrew: "answer." The idea is, that God would answer his prayers, and that his character would, in answer to those prayers, be set right before the world.