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Psalms 38:22

    Psalms 38:22 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    Make haste to help me, O Lord my salvation.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    Make haste to help me, O Lord my salvation.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    Make haste to help me, O Lord, my salvation.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    Come quickly to give me help, O Lord, my salvation.

    Webster's Revision

    Make haste to help me, O Lord, my salvation.

    World English Bible

    Hurry to help me, Lord, my salvation. For the Chief Musician. For Jeduthun. A Psalm by David.

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    Make haste to help me, O Lord my salvation.

    Definitions for Psalms 38:22

    Haste - To hurry; to urge on quickly.

    Clarke's Commentary on Psalms 38:22

    Make haste to help me - I am dying; save, Lord, or I perish. Whoever carefuIly reads over this Psalm will see what a grievous and bitter thing it is to sin against the Lord, and especially to sin after having known his mercy, and after having escaped from the corruption that is in the world. Reader, be on thy guard; a life of righteousness may be lost by giving way to a moment's temptation, and a fair character sullied for ever! Let him that most assuredly standeth take heed lest he fall.

    'Tis but a grain of sweet that one can sow,

    To reap a harvest of wide-wasting wo.

    Barnes' Notes on Psalms 38:22

    Make haste to help me - Margin, as in Hebrew: "for my help." This is an earnest prayer that God would come immediately to his rescue.

    O Lord my salvation - See the notes at Psalm 27:1. The effect, therefore, of the trials that came upon the psalmist was to lead him to cry most earnestly to God. Those sorrows led him to God. This is one of the designed effects of affliction. Trouble never accomplishes its proper effect unless it leads us to God; and anything that "will" lead us to him is a gain in the end. The deeper our trouble, therefore, the greater may be the ultimate good to us; and at the end of life, when we come to look over all that has happened in our journey through this world, that on which we may look back with most satisfaction and gratitude may be the sorrows and afflictions that have befallen us - for these will be then seen to have been among the chief instrumentalities by which we were weaned from sin; by which we were led to the Saviour; by which we were induced to seek a preparation for heaven. No Christian, when he comes to die, ever feels that he has been too much afflicted, or that any trial has come upon him for which there was not occasion, and which was not designed and adapted to do him good.