Search the Bible
* powered by Bible Study Tools

Psalms 39:13

    Psalms 39:13 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    O spare me, that I may recover strength, before I go hence, and be no more.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    O spare me, that I may recover strength, before I go hence, and be no more.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    Oh spare me, that I may recover strength, Before I go hence, and be no more.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    Let your wrath be turned away from me, so that I may be comforted, before I go away from here, and become nothing.

    Webster's Revision

    Oh spare me, that I may recover strength, Before I go hence, and be no more.

    World English Bible

    Oh spare me, that I may recover strength, before I go away, and exist no more." For the Chief Musician. A Psalm by David.

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    O spare me, that I may recover strength, before I go hence, and be no more.

    Clarke's Commentary on Psalms 39:13

    O spare me - Take me not from this state of probation till I have a thorough preparation for a state of blessedness. This he terms recovering his strength - being restored to the favor and image of God, from which he had fallen. This should be the daily cry of every human spirit: Restore me to thine image, guide me by thy counsel, and then reeeive me to thy glory!

    Barnes' Notes on Psalms 39:13

    O spare me - The word used here - from שׁעה shâ‛âh - means "to look;" and then, in connection with the preposition, "to look away from;" and it here means, "Look away from me;" that is, Do not come to inflict death on me. Preserve me. The idea is this: God seemed to have fixed his eyes on him, and to be pursuing him with the expressions of his displeasure (compare Job 16:9); and the psalmist now prays that he would "turn away his eyes," and leave him.

    That I may recover strength - The word used here - בלג bâlag - means, in Arabic, to be bright; to shine forth; and then, to make cheerful, to enliven one's countenance, or to be joyful, glad. In Job 9:27, it is rendered "comfort;" in Job 10:20, that I "may take comfort;" in Amos 5:9, "strengtheneth." It is not used elsewhere. The idea is that of being "cheered up;" of being strengthened and invigorated before he should pass away. He wished to be permitted to recover the strength which he had lost, and especially to receive consolation, before he should leave the earth. He desired that his closing days might not be under a cloud, but that he might obtain brighter and more cheerful views, and have more of the consolations of religion before he should be removed finally from this world. It is a wish not to leave the world in gloom, or with gloomy and desponding views, but with a cheerful view of the past; with joyful confidence in the government of God; and with bright anticipations of the coming world.

    Before I go hence - Before Idie.

    And be no more - Be no more upon the earth. Compare Psalm 6:5, note; Psalm 30:9, note. See also the notes at Job 14:1-12. Whatever may have been his views of the future world, he desired to be cheered and comforted in the prospect of passing away finally from earth. He was unwilling to go down to the grave in gloom, or under the influence of the dark and distressing views which he had experienced, and to which he refers in this psalm. A religious man, about to leave the world, should desire to have bright hopes and anticipations. For his own comfort and peace, for the honor of religion, for the glory of God, he should not leave those around under the impression that religion does nothing to comfort a dying man, or to inspire with hope the mind of one about to leave the earth, or to give to the departing friend of God cheerful anticipations of the life to come. A joyful confidence in God and his government, when a man is about to leave the world, does much, very much, to impress the minds of others with a conviction of the truth and reality of religion, as dark and gloomy views can hardly fail to lead the world to ask what that religion is worth which will not inspire a dying man with hope, and make him calm in the closing scene.

    Wesley's Notes on Psalms 39:13

    39:13 No more - Among the living, or in this world.