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Psalms 39:4

    Psalms 39:4 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    LORD, make me to know mine end, and the measure of my days, what it is: that I may know how frail I am.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    LORD, make me to know my end, and the measure of my days, what it is: that I may know how frail I am.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    Jehovah, make me to know mine end, And the measure of my days, what it is; Let me know how frail I am.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    Lord, give me knowledge of my end, and of the measure of my days, so that I may see how feeble I am.

    Webster's Revision

    Jehovah, make me to know mine end, And the measure of my days, what it is; Let me know how frail I am.

    World English Bible

    "Yahweh, show me my end, what is the measure of my days. Let me know how frail I am.

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    LORD, make me to know mine end, and the measure of my days, what it is; let me know how frail I am.

    Clarke's Commentary on Psalms 39:4

    Lord, make me to know mine end - I am weary of life; I wish to know the measure of my days, that I may see how long I have to suffer, and how frail I am. I wish to know what is wanting to make up the number of the days I have to live.

    Barnes' Notes on Psalms 39:4

    Lord, make me to know mine end - This expresses evidently the substance of those anxious and troubled thoughts Psalm 39:1-2 to which he had been unwilling to give utterance. His thoughts turned on the shortness of life; on the mystery of the divine arrangement by which it had been made so short; and on the fact that so many troubles and sorrows had been crowded into a life so frail and so soon to terminate. With some impatience, and with a consciousness that he had been indulging feelings on this subject which were not proper, and which would do injury if they were expressed "before men," he now pours out these feelings before God, and asks what is to be the end of this; how long this is to continue; when his own sorrows will cease. It was an impatient desire to know when the end would be, with a spirit of insubmission to the arrangements of Providence by which his life had been made so brief, and by which so much suffering had been appointed.

    And the measure of my days, what it is - How long I am to live; how long I am to bear these accumulated sorrows.

    That I may know how frail I am - Margin: "What time I have here." Prof. Alexander renders this: "when I shall cease." So DeWette. The Hebrew word used here - חדל châdêl - means "ceasing to be;" hence, "frail;" then, destitute, left, forsaken. An exact translation would be, "that I may know at what (time) or (point) I am ceasing, or about to cease." It is equivalent to a prayer that he might know when these sufferings - when a life so full of sorrow - would come to an end. The language is an expression of impatience; the utterance of a feeling which the psalmist knew was not right in itself, and which would do injury if expressed before men, but which the intensity of his feelings would not permit him to restrain, and to which he, therefore, gives utterance before God. Similar expressions of impatience in view of the sufferings of a life so short as this, and with so little to alleviate its sorrows, may be seen much amplified in Job 3:1-26; Job 6:4-12; Job 7:7; Job 14:1-13. Before we blame the sacred writers for the indulgence of these feelings, let us carefully examine our own hearts, and recall what has passed through our own minds in view of the mysteries of the divine administration; and let us remember that one great object of the Bible is to record the actual feelings of men - not to vindicate them, but to show what human nature is even in the best circumstances, and what the human heart is when as yet but partially sanctified.

    Wesley's Notes on Psalms 39:4

    39:4 My end - Make me sensible of the shortness and uncertainly of life, and the near approach of death.