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Psalms 40:11

    Psalms 40:11 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    Withhold not thou thy tender mercies from me, O LORD: let thy lovingkindness and thy truth continually preserve me.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    Withhold not you your tender mercies from me, O LORD: let your loving kindness and your truth continually preserve me.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    Withhold not thou thy tender mercies from me, O Jehovah; Let thy lovingkindness and thy truth continually preserve me.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    Take not away your gentle mercies from me, O Lord; let your mercy and your faith keep me safe for ever.

    Webster's Revision

    Withhold not thou thy tender mercies from me, O Jehovah; Let thy lovingkindness and thy truth continually preserve me.

    World English Bible

    Don't withhold your tender mercies from me, Yahweh. Let your loving kindness and your truth continually preserve me.

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    Withhold not thou thy tender mercies from me, O LORD: let thy lovingkindness and thy truth continually preserve me.

    Definitions for Psalms 40:11

    Let - To hinder or obstruct.

    Clarke's Commentary on Psalms 40:11

    Thy tender mercies - רחמיך rachameycha, such propensities and feelings as a mother bears to her child; or animals in general to their young.

    Let thy loving-kindness - חסדך chasdecha, thy overflowing and superabundant mercy.

    And thy truth - What is revealed in thy word: continually preserve me. Mercy to help me, truth to direct me; and, by the operation of both, I shall be continually preserved from sin and evil.

    Barnes' Notes on Psalms 40:11

    Withhold not thou thy tender mercies from me, O Lord - Do not restrain or hold back thy compassions. Let thy mercies - the expressions of thy love - flow out freely toward me in connection with what I have done. As applicable to the Redeemer, this is a prayer that God would bestow upon him in connection with his work, and as a reward of his work, appropriate proofs of his goodness. And especially is this to be understood here as a prayer for support and deliverance in the sorrows that came upon him in the accomplishment of his work. The prayer is intermediate between the expression of his purpose to do the will of God when all other means of salvation had failed Psalm 40:6-8, and the sorrows or sufferings that would come upon him in the accomplishment of his work Psalm 40:12-13. He saw himself at this point of his life, as represented in the psalm, as about to sink into the depth of woes. He had kept the law of God, and had by his obedience thus far done His will. He had made known the truth of God, and had declared His great message to the assembled multitude that had crowded his path, and thronged to hear him. He saw himself now about to enter the vale of sorrow; to plunge into that depth of the unutterable woes connected with the making of an atonement. He prayed, therefore, that, in these approaching sorrows, God would not withhold the expression of his tender mercy. The point of time, therefore, in the Redeemer's life which the verse before us occupies, is that awful and sorrowful hour when, his public work of teaching and of miracles finished, he was about to endure the agonies of Gethsemane and of the cross.

    Let thy loving-kindness - Thy mercy. "And thy truth." Thy promises; thy plighted support and strength; thy fidelity. That is, he prayed that God would show himself true and faithful in bearing him through the great work of the atonement.

    Continually - Through the whole of these sorrows. Do not for a moment leave or forsake me.

    Preserve me - Keep me from sinking under these woes; from speaking any improper word; from shrinking back; from being overcome by the tempter; from failing in the great work now to be accomplished. As the Redeemer had a human as well as a divine nature; as he was man, with all human susceptibilities to suffering, it was not inappropriate that he should utter this prayer, and lift up his heart with the utmost earnestness to God, that he might not be forsaken in the consummation of the great work of his life, and that this work might not fail.

    Wesley's Notes on Psalms 40:11

    40:11 With - hold not - David, having been transported by the spirit of God to the commemoration of the great mystery of the Messiah, he now seems to be led back by the same spirit, to the consideration of his own case.