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Psalms 50:7

    Psalms 50:7 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    Hear, O my people, and I will speak; O Israel, and I will testify against thee: I am God, even thy God.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    Hear, O my people, and I will speak; O Israel, and I will testify against you: I am God, even your God.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    Hear, O my people, and I will speak; O Israel, and I will testify unto thee: I am God, even thy God.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    Give ear, O my people, to my words; O Israel, I will be a witness against you; I am God, even your God.

    Webster's Revision

    Hear, O my people, and I will speak; O Israel, and I will testify unto thee: I am God, even thy God.

    World English Bible

    "Hear, my people, and I will speak; Israel, and I will testify against you. I am God, your God.

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    Hear, O my people, and I will speak; O Israel, and I will testify unto thee: I am God, even thy God.

    Clarke's Commentary on Psalms 50:7

    Hear, O my people - As they were now amply informed concerning the nature and certainty of the general judgment, and were still in a state of probation, Asaph proceeds to show them the danger to which they were exposed, and the necessity of repentance and amendment, that when that great day should arrive, they might be found among those who had made a covenant with God by sacrifice. And he shows them that the sacrifice with which God would be well pleased was quite different from the bullocks, he-goats, etc., which they were in the habit of offering. In short, he shows here that God has intended to abrogate those sacrifices, as being no longer of any service: for when the people began to trust in them, without looking to the thing signified, it was time to put them away. When the people began to pay Divine honors to the brazen serpent, though it was originally an ordinance of God's appointment for the healing of the Israelites, it was ordered to be taken away; called nehushtan, a bit of brass; and broken to pieces. The sacrifices under the Jewish law were of God's appointment; but now that the people began to put their trust in them, God despised them.

    Barnes' Notes on Psalms 50:7

    Hear, O my people, and I will speak - God himself is now introduced as speaking, and as stating the principles on which the judgment will proceed. The previous verses are introductory, or are designed to bring the scene of the judgment before the mind. The solemn scene now opens, and God himself speaks, especially as rebuking the disposition to rely on the mere forms of religion, while its spirituality and its power are denied. The purpose of the whole is, by asking how these things will appear in the judgment, to imply the vanity of "mere" forms of religion now. The particular address is made to the "people" of God, or to "Israel," because the purpose of the psalmist was to rebuke the prevailing tendency to rely on outward forms.

    O Israel, and I will testify against thee - In the judgment. In view of those scenes, and as "at" that time, I will "now" bear this solemn testimony against the views which you entertain on the subject of religion, and the practices which prevail in your worship.

    I am God, even thy God - I am the true God, and therefore I have a right to speak; I am "thy" God - the God who has been the Protector of thy people - acknowledged as the God of the nation - and therefore I claim the right to declare the great principles which pertain to true worship, and which constitute true religion.

    Wesley's Notes on Psalms 50:7

    50:7 Hear - Having brought in God, as coming to judgment, he now gives an account of the process and sentence of the judge. Testify - I will declare my charge against thee. Thy God - Not only in general, but in a special manner, by that solemn covenant made at Sinai; whereby I avouched thee to be my peculiar people, and thou didst avouch me to be thy God.