Search the Bible
* powered by Bible Study Tools

Psalms 51:7

    Psalms 51:7 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    Purge me with hyssop, and I shall be clean: wash me, and I shall be whiter than snow.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    Purge me with hyssop, and I shall be clean: wash me, and I shall be whiter than snow.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    Purify me with hyssop, and I shall be clean: Wash me, and I shall be whiter than snow.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    Make me free from sin with hyssop: let me be washed whiter than snow.

    Webster's Revision

    Purify me with hyssop, and I shall be clean: Wash me, and I shall be whiter than snow.

    World English Bible

    Purify me with hyssop, and I will be clean. Wash me, and I will be whiter than snow.

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    Purge me with hyssop, and I shall be clean: wash me, and I shall be whiter than snow.

    Definitions for Psalms 51:7

    Hyssop - A bitter herb.

    Clarke's Commentary on Psalms 51:7

    Purge me with hyssop - תחטאני techatteeni, "thou shalt make a sin-offering for me;" probably alluding to the cleansing of the leper: Leviticus 14:1, etc. The priest took two clean birds, cedar-wood, scarlet, and hyssop; one of the birds was killed; and the living bird, with the scarlet, cedar, and hyssop, dipped in the blood of the bird that had been killed, and then sprinkled over the person who had been infected. But it is worthy of remark that this ceremony was not performed till the plague of the leprosy had been healed in the leper; (Leviticus 14:3); and the ceremony above mentioned was for the purpose of declaring to the people that the man was healed, that he might be restored to his place in society, having been healed of a disease that the finger of God alone could remove. This David seems to have full in view; hence he requests the Lord to make the sin-offering for him, and to show to the people that he had accepted him, and cleansed him from his sin.

    Barnes' Notes on Psalms 51:7

    Purge me with hyssop, and I shall be clean - On the word hyssop, see the notes at John 19:29; notes at Hebrews 9:19. The plant or herb was much used by the Hebrews in their sacred purifications and sprinklings: Exodus 12:22; Leviticus 14:4, Leviticus 14:6,Leviticus 14:49, Leviticus 14:51; 1 Kings 4:33. Under this name the Hebrews seem to have comprised not only the common "hyssop" of the shops, but also other aromatic plants, as mint, wild marjoram, etc. - Gesenius, "Lexicon" The idea of the psalmist here evidently is not that the mere sprinkling with hyssop would make him clean; but he prays for that cleansing of which the sprinkling with hyssop was an emblem, or which was designed to be represented by that. The whole structure of the psalm implies that he was seeking an "internal" change, and that he did not depend on any mere outward ordinance or rite. The word rendered "purge" is from the word חטא châṭâ' - which means "to sin." In the Piel form it means to bear the blame (or "loss") for anything; and then to "atone for, to make atonement, to expiate:" Genesis 31:39; Leviticus 6:26; Numbers 19:19. Here it conveys the notion of cleansing from sin "by" a sacred rite, or by that which was signified by a sacred rite. The idea was that the sin was to be removed or taken away, so that he might be free from it, or that "that" might be accomplished which was represented by the sprinkling with hyssop, and that the soul might be made pure. Luther has rendered it with great force - Entsundige mich mit Ysop - "Unsin me with hyssop."

    Wash me - That is, cleanse me. Sin is represented as "defiling," and the idea of "washing" it away is often employed in the Scriptures. See the notes at Isaiah 1:16.

    And I shall be whiter than snow - See the notes at Isaiah 1:18. The prayer is, that he might be made "entirely" clean; that there might be no remaining pollution in his soul.

    Wesley's Notes on Psalms 51:7

    51:7 Hyssop - As lepers, are by thy appointment purified by the use of hyssop and other things, so do thou cleanse me a leprous and polluted creature, by thy grace, and by that blood of Christ, which is signified by those ceremonial usages.