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Psalms 54:7

    Psalms 54:7 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    For he hath delivered me out of all trouble: and mine eye hath seen his desire upon mine enemies.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    For he has delivered me out of all trouble: and my eye has seen his desire on my enemies.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    For he hath delivered me out of all trouble; And mine eye hath seen my desire upon mine enemies.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    Because it has been my saviour from all my trouble; and my eyes have seen the punishment of my haters.

    Webster's Revision

    For he hath delivered me out of all trouble; And mine eye hath seen my desire upon mine enemies.

    World English Bible

    For he has delivered me out of all trouble. My eye has seen triumph over my enemies. For the Chief Musician. On stringed instruments. A contemplation by David.

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    For he hath delivered me out of all trouble; and mine eye hath seen my desire upon mine enemies.

    Clarke's Commentary on Psalms 54:7

    For he hath delivered me - Saul had now decamped; and was returned to save his territories; and David in the meanwhile escaped to En-gedi. God was most evidently the author of this deliverance.

    Mine eye hath seen his desire upon mine enemies - It is not likely that this Psalm was written after the death of Saul; and therefore David could not say that he had seen his desire. But there is nothing in the text for his desire; and the words might be translated, My eye hath seen my enemies - they have been so near that I could plainly discover them. Thus almost all the Versions have understood the text. I have seen them, and yet they were not permitted to approach me. God has been my Deliverer.

    Barnes' Notes on Psalms 54:7

    For he hath delivered me out of all trouble - This is spoken either in confident expectation of what would be, or as the statement of a general truth that God did deliver him from all trouble. It was what he had experienced in his past life; it was what he confidently expected in all time to come.

    And mine eye hath seen his desire upon mine enemies - The words "his desire" are not in the original. A literal translation would be, "And on my enemies hath my eye looked." The meaning is, that they had been overthrown; they had been unsuccessful in their malignant attempts against him; and he had had the satisfaction of "seeing" them thus discomfited. Their overthrow had not merely been reported to him, but he had had ocular demonstration of its reality. This is not the expression of malice, but of certainty. The fact on which the eye of the psalmist rested was his own safety. Of that he was assured by what he had witnessed with his own eyes; and in that fact he rejoiced. There is no more reason to charge malignity in this case on David, or to suppose that he rejoiced in the destruction of his enemies as such, than there is in our own case when we are rescued from impending danger. It is proper for Americans to rejoice in their freedom, and to give thanks to God for it; nor, in doing this, is it to be supposed that there is a malicious pleasure in the fact that in the accomplishment of this thousands of British soldiers were slain, or that thousands of women and children as the result of their discomfiture were made widows and orphans. We can be thankful for the mercies which we enjoy without having any malignant delight in those woes of others through which our blessings may have come upon us.