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Psalms 55:1

    Psalms 55:1 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    Give ear to my prayer, O God; and hide not thyself from my supplication.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    Give ear to my prayer, O God; and hide not yourself from my supplication.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    Give ear to my prayer, O God; And hide not thyself from my supplication.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    <To the chief music-maker, on Neginoth. Maschil. Of David.> Give hearing to my prayer, O God; and let not your ear be shut against my request.

    Webster's Revision

    Give ear to my prayer, O God; And hide not thyself from my supplication.

    World English Bible

    Listen to my prayer, God. Don't hide yourself from my supplication.

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    For the Chief Musician; on stringed instruments. Maschil of David. Give ear to my prayer, O God; and hide not thyself from my supplication.

    Definitions for Psalms 55:1

    Ear - To work, till, or plough the ground.
    Supplication - Petition; an expression of need.

    Clarke's Commentary on Psalms 55:1

    Give ear to my prayer - The frequency of such petitions shows the great earnestness of David's soul. If God did not hear and help, he knew he could not succeed elsewhere; therefore he continues to knock at the gate of God's mercy.

    Barnes' Notes on Psalms 55:1

    Give ear to my prayer - See the notes at Psalm 5:1; Psalm 17:6. This is the language of earnestness. The psalmist was in deep affliction, and he pleaded, therefore, that God would not turn away from him in his troubles.

    And hide not thyself from my supplication - That is, Do not withdraw thyself, or render thyself inaccessible to my prayer. Do not so conceal thyself that I may not have the privilege of approaching thee. Compare the notes at Isaiah 1:15. See also Ezekiel 22:26; Proverbs 28:27; Leviticus 20:4; 1 Samuel 12:3. The same word is used in all these places, and the general meaning is that of "shutting the eyes upon," as implying neglect. So also in Lamentations 3:56, the phrase "to hide the ear" means to turn away so as not to hear. The earnest prayer of the psalmist here is, that God would not, as it were, withdraw or conceal himself, but would give free access to himself in prayer. The language is, of course, figurative, but it illustrates what often occurs when God seems to withdraw himself; when our prayers do not appear to be heard; when God is apparently unwilling to attend to us.