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Psalms 55:2

    Psalms 55:2 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    Attend unto me, and hear me: I mourn in my complaint, and make a noise;

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    Attend to me, and hear me: I mourn in my complaint, and make a noise;

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    Attend unto me, and answer me: I am restless in my complaint, and moan,

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    Give thought to me, and let my prayer be answered: I have been made low in sorrow;

    Webster's Revision

    Attend unto me, and answer me: I am restless in my complaint, and moan,

    World English Bible

    Attend to me, and answer me. I am restless in my complaint, and moan,

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    Attend unto me, and answer me: I am restless in my complaint, and moan;

    Clarke's Commentary on Psalms 55:2

    I mourn in my complaint - בשיחי besichi, in my sighing; a strong guttural sound, expressive of the natural accents of sorrow.

    And make a noise - I am in a tumult - I am strongly agitated.

    Barnes' Notes on Psalms 55:2

    Attend unto me, and hear me - This also is the language of earnest supplication, as if he was afraid that God would not regard his cry. These varied forms of speech show the intense earnestness of the psalmist, and his deep conviction that he must have help from God.

    I mourn - The word used here - רוד rûd - means properly to wander about; to ramble - especially applied to animals that have broken loose; and then, to inquire after, to seek, as one does "by running up and down;" hence, to desire, to wish. Thus in Hosea 11:12 - "Judah runs wild toward God," - in our translation, "Judah yet ruleth with God." The word occurs also in Jeremiah 2:31, "We are lords" (margin, have dominion); and in Genesis 27:40, "When thou shalt have the dominion." It is not elsewhere found in the Scriptures. The idea here seems not to be to mourn, but to inquire earnestly; to seek; to look for, as one does who wanders about, or who looks every way for help. David was in deep distress. He looked in every direction. He earnestly desired to find God as a Helper. He was in the condition of one who had lost his way, or who had lost what was most valuable to him; and he directed his eyes most earnestly toward God for help.

    In my complaint - The word here employed commonly means speech, discourse, meditation. It here occurs in the sense of complaint, as in Job 7:13; Job 9:27; Job 21:4; Job 23:2; Psalm 142:2; 1 Samuel 1:16. It is not used, however, to denote complaint in the sense of fault-finding, but in the sense of deep distress. As the word is now commonly used, we connect with it the idea of fault-finding, complaining, accusing, or the idea that we have been dealt with unjustly. This is not the meaning in tills place, or in the Scriptures generally. It is the language of a troubled, not of an injured spirit.

    And make a noise - To wit, by prayer; or, by groaning. The psalmist did not hesitate to give vent to his feelings by groans, or sobs, or prayers. Such expressions are not merely indications of deep feeling, but they are among the appointed means of relief. They are the effort which nature makes to throw off the burden, and if they are without complaining or impatience they are not wrong. See Isaiah 38:14; Isaiah 59:11; Hebrews 5:7; Matthew 27:46.