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Psalms 64:1

    Psalms 64:1 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    Hear my voice, O God, in my prayer: preserve my life from fear of the enemy.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    Hear my voice, O God, in my prayer: preserve my life from fear of the enemy.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    Hear my voice, O God, in my complaint: Preserve my life from fear of the enemy.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    <To the chief music-maker. A Psalm. Of David.> O God, let the voice of my grief come to your ear: keep my life from the fear of those who are against me.

    Webster's Revision

    Hear my voice, O God, in my complaint: Preserve my life from fear of the enemy.

    World English Bible

    Hear my voice, God, in my complaint. Preserve my life from fear of the enemy.

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    For the Chief Musician. A Psalm of David. Hear my voice, O God, in my complaint: preserve my life from fear of the enemy.

    Clarke's Commentary on Psalms 64:1

    Hear my voice - The psalmist feared for his life, and the lives of his fellow-captives; and he sought help of God. He prayed, and he lifted up his voice; and thus showed his earnestness.

    Barnes' Notes on Psalms 64:1

    Hear my voice, O God, in my prayer - The use of the word voice here would seem to imply that this was audible prayer, or that, though alone, he gave utterance to his petitions aloud. We have this same use of the word often in the Psalms, making it probable that even private prayers were uttered in an audible manner. In most cases, when there is no danger of being overheard, or of its being construed as ostentation or Pharisaism, this is favorable to the spirit of secret devotion. Compare the notes at Daniel 6:10. The word here rendered prayer means properly speech, discourse; then, complaint; then, meditation. It is most commonly rendered complaint. See Job 7:13; Job 9:27; Job 10:1; Job 21:4; Psalm 55:2 (notes); Psalm 102 (Title); Psalm 142:2. It refers here to a state of mind caused by trouble and danger, when the deep meditation on his troubles and dangers found expression in audible words - whether those words were complaint or petition. As there are no indications in the psalm that David was disposed to complain in the sense of blaming God, the proper interpretation here is that his deep meditations took the form of prayer.

    Preserve my life from fear of the enemy - Either Saul or Absalom. He prayed that his life might be made so secure that he would not have occasion to be afraid of his enemy.