Search the Bible
* powered by Bible Study Tools

Psalms 65:7

    Psalms 65:7 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    Which stilleth the noise of the seas, the noise of their waves, and the tumult of the people.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    Which stills the noise of the seas, the noise of their waves, and the tumult of the people.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    Who stilleth the roaring of the seas, The roaring of their waves, And the tumult of the peoples.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    Who makes the loud voice of the sea quiet, and puts an end to the sound of its waves.

    Webster's Revision

    Who stilleth the roaring of the seas, The roaring of their waves, And the tumult of the peoples.

    World English Bible

    who stills the roaring of the seas, the roaring of their waves, and the turmoil of the nations.

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    Which stilleth the roaring of the seas, the roaring of their waves, and the tumult of the peoples.

    Clarke's Commentary on Psalms 65:7

    Stilleth the noise of the seas - Thou art Sovereign over all the operation of sea and land. Earthquakes are under thy control: so are the flux and reflux of the sea; and all storms and tempests by which the great deep is agitated. Even the headstrong multitude is under thy control; for thou stillest the madness of the people.

    Barnes' Notes on Psalms 65:7

    Which stilleth the noise of the seas - He calms the seas when they have been agitated by the storm. He causes the mighty waves to settle down, and the whole surface of the ocean becomes calm and smooth. The storm subsides at his command, and the sea is still. It was the manifestation of this power which demonstrated so clearly the divinity of the Lord Jesus, when he said to the troubled waves, "Peace, be still, and the wind ceased, and there was a great calm." Mark 4:39. Compare Psalm 107:29.

    The noise of their waves - The loud roar of the waters, so that they are still.

    And the tumult of the people - The raging; the fury; the excitement of assembled multitudes, resembling the raging waves of the ocean. This comparison is very common. See Isaiah 17:12-13. Compare the notes at Revelation 19:6. This is perhaps a more striking and wonderful exhibition of the power of God than that of calming down the waves of the ocean. In the one case, it is the exertion of mere power on nature, acting through its established laws, and where there is no resistance of will; in the other, it is power exerted over the will; power over agents conscious that they are free, and where the worst passions meet and mingle and rage.

    Psalm 65:7And create evil - The parallelism here shows that this is not to be understood in the sense of all evil, but of that which is the opposite of peace and prosperity. That is, God directs judgments, disappointments, trials, and calamities; he has power to suffer the mad passions of people to rage, and to afflict nations with war; he presides over adverse as well as prosperous events. The passage does not prove that God is the author of moral evil, or sin, and such a sentiment is abhorrent to the general strain of the Bible, and to all just views of the character of a holy God.

    Wesley's Notes on Psalms 65:7

    65:7 Tumult - No less wild and impetuous.