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Psalms 68:1

    Psalms 68:1 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    Let God arise, let his enemies be scattered: let them also that hate him flee before him.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    Let God arise, let his enemies be scattered: let them also that hate him flee before him.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    Let God arise, let his enemies be scattered; Let them also that hate him flee before him.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    <To the chief music-maker. Of David. A Psalm. A Song.> Let God be seen, and let his haters be put to flight; let those who are against him be turned back before him.

    Webster's Revision

    Let God arise, let his enemies be scattered; Let them also that hate him flee before him.

    World English Bible

    Let God arise! Let his enemies be scattered! Let them who hate him also flee before him.

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    For the Chief Musician. A Psalm of David, a Song. Let God arise, let his enemies be scattered; let them also that hate him flee before him.

    Definitions for Psalms 68:1

    Let - To hinder or obstruct.

    Clarke's Commentary on Psalms 68:1

    Let God arise - This was sung when the Levites took up the ark upon their shoulders; see Numbers 10:35-36 (note), and the notes there.

    Barnes' Notes on Psalms 68:1

    Let God arise - See the notes at Psalm 3:7. There is an obvious reterence here to the words used by Moses on the removal of the ark in Numbers 10:35. The same language was also employed by Solomon when the ark was removed to the temple, and deposited in the most holy place 2 Chronicles 6:41 :" Now therefore arise, O Lord God, into thy resting place, thou, and the ark of thy strength." It would seem probable, therefore, that this psalm was composed on some such occasion.

    Let his enemies be scattered - So in Numbers 10:35 : "Rise up, Lord, and let thine enemies be scattered; and let them that hate thee flee before thee." The ark was the symbol of the divine presence, and the idea is, that whereever that was, the enemies of God would be subdued, or that it was only by the power of Him who was supposed to reside there that his enemies could be overcome.

    Let them also that hate him flee before him - Almost the exact language used by Moses in Numbers 10:35. It is possible that this may have been used on some occasion when the Hebrews were going out to war; but the more probable supposition is that it is general language designed to illustrate the power of God, or to state that his rising up, at any time, would be followed by the discomfiture of his enemies. The placing of the ark where it was designed to remain permanently would be a proper occasion for suggesting this general truth, that all the enemies of God must be scattered when he rose up in his majesty and power.