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Psalms 7:2

    Psalms 7:2 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    Lest he tear my soul like a lion, rending it in pieces, while there is none to deliver.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    Lest he tear my soul like a lion, rending it in pieces, while there is none to deliver.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    Lest they tear my soul like a lion, Rending it in pieces, while there is none to deliver.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    So that he may not come rushing on my soul like a lion, wounding it, while there is no one to be my saviour.

    Webster's Revision

    Lest they tear my soul like a lion, Rending it in pieces, while there is none to deliver.

    World English Bible

    lest they tear apart my soul like a lion, ripping it in pieces, while there is none to deliver.

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    Lest he tear my soul like a lion, rending it in pieces, while there is none to deliver.

    Clarke's Commentary on Psalms 7:2

    Lest he tear my soul like a lion - These words seem to answer well to Saul. As the lion is king in the forest; so was Saul king over the land. As the lion, in his fierceness, seizes at once, and tears his prey in pieces; so David expected to be seized and suddenly destroyed by Saul. He had already, in his rage, thrown his javelin at him, intending to have pierced him to the wall with it. As from the power of the lion no beast in the forest could deliver any thing; so David knew that Saul's power was irresistible, and that none of his friends or well-wishers could save or deliver him out of such hands. "Lest he tear my soul (my life) like a lion, rending it in pieces, while there is none to deliver." All this answers to Saul, and to none else.

    Barnes' Notes on Psalms 7:2

    Lest he - Lest "Cush" should do this. See the title, and the introduction to the psalm, Section 2.

    Tear my soul like a lion - Tear or rend my "life" - that is, "me" - like a lion. The word rendered "soul" here - נפשׁ nephesh - refers, as it properly does elsewhere, to the "life," and not to the soul, as we use the term, denoting the thinking, immortal part. The simple idea is, that David was apprehensive of his "life," and, in order to indicate his great peril, he uses language derived from the fierceness of the lion. Such imagery would be well understood in a country where lions abounded, and nothing could more strikingly denote the danger in which David was, or the fierceness of the wrath of the enemy that he dreaded.

    Rending it in pieces - Rending me in pieces. Or rather, perhaps, breaking or crushing the bones, for the word used - פרק pâraq (from our English word "break") - means "to break, to crush," and would apply to the act of the lion crushing or breaking the bones of his victim as he devoured it.

    While there is none to deliver - Denoting the complete destruction which he feared would come upon him. The figure is that of a solitary man seized by a powerful lion, with no one at hand to rescue him. So David felt that if God did not interfere, he would fall into the hands of this fierce and wrathful enemy.

    Wesley's Notes on Psalms 7:2

    7:2 Lest - Mine enemy. Tear - Out of my body.