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Psalms 7:5

    Psalms 7:5 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    Let the enemy persecute my soul, and take it; yea, let him tread down my life upon the earth, and lay mine honour in the dust. Selah.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    Let the enemy persecute my soul, and take it; yes, let him tread down my life on the earth, and lay my honor in the dust. Selah.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    Let the enemy pursue my soul, and overtake it; Yea, let him tread my life down to the earth, And lay my glory in the dust. Selah

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    Let my hater go after my soul and take it; let my life be crushed to the earth, and my honour into the dust. (Selah.)

    Webster's Revision

    Let the enemy pursue my soul, and overtake it; Yea, let him tread my life down to the earth, And lay my glory in the dust. Selah

    World English Bible

    let the enemy pursue my soul, and overtake it; yes, let him tread my life down to the earth, and lay my glory in the dust. Selah.

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    Let the enemy pursue my soul, and overtake it; yea, let him tread my life down to the earth, and lay my glory in the dust. Selah

    Definitions for Psalms 7:5

    Let - To hinder or obstruct.
    Persecute - To pursue after in order to overtake.
    Yea - Yes; certainly.

    Clarke's Commentary on Psalms 7:5

    Let the enemy persecute my soul - If I have been guilty of the things laid to my charge, let the worst evils fall upon me.

    Barnes' Notes on Psalms 7:5

    Let the enemy persecute my soul - Persecute my "life," for so the word rendered "soul," נפשׁ nephesh, is evidently used here. He was willing, if he had been guilty of the thing charged upon him, that the enemy here referred to should "pursue" or persecute him until he should destroy his life. Compare with this the expression of Paul in Acts 25:11. The meaning here is simply that if he were a guilty man, in the manner charged on him, he would be willing to be treated accordingly. He did not wish to screen himself from any just treatment; and if he had been guilty he would not complain even if he were cut off from the land of the living.

    And take it - Take my life; put me to death.

    Yea, let him tread down my life upon the earth - The allusion here is to the manner in which the vanquished were often treated in battle, when they were rode over by horses, or trampled by men into the dust. The idea of David is, that if he was guilty he would be willing that his enemy should triumph over him, should subdue him, should treat him with the utmost indignity and scorn.

    And lay mine honor in the dust - All the tokens or marks of my honor or distinction in life. That is, I am willing to be utterly degraded and humbled, if I have been guilty of this conduct toward him who is my enemy. The idea in all this is, that David did not wish to screen himself from the treatment which he deserved if he had done wrong. His own principles were such that he would have felt that the treatment here referred to would have been right and proper as a recompense for such base conduct; and he would not have had a word to say against it. His desire for the interposition of God, therefore, arose solely from the fact of his feeling that, in these respects, he was entirely innocent, and that the conduct of his enemy was unjust and cruel.

    Selah - A musical pause, not affecting the sense, but introduced here, perhaps, because the sense of the psalm now demanded a change in the style of the music. See the notes at Psalm 3:2.