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Psalms 73:11

    Psalms 73:11 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    And they say, How doth God know? and is there knowledge in the most High?

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    And they say, How does God know? and is there knowledge in the most High?

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    And they say, How doth God know? And is there knowledge in the Most High?

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    And they say, How will the Lord see this? is there knowledge in the Most High?

    Webster's Revision

    And they say, How doth God know? And is there knowledge in the Most High?

    World English Bible

    They say, "How does God know? Is there knowledge in the Most High?"

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    And they say, How doth God know? and is there knowledge in the Most High?

    Definitions for Psalms 73:11

    Doth - To do; to produce; make.

    Clarke's Commentary on Psalms 73:11

    They say, How doth God know? - My people are so stumbled with the prosperity of the wicked, that they are ready in their temptation to say, "Surely, God cannot know these things, or he would never dispense his favors thus." Others consider these words as the saying of the wicked: "We may oppress these people as we please, and live as we list; God knows nothing about it."

    Barnes' Notes on Psalms 73:11

    And they say - His people say. The connection demands this interpretation. The meaning is, that his people, as they return again and again to this subject Psalm 73:10, are constrained to put this question. They are compelled by these facts to start such painful inquiries about God; and distressing as the inquiries are, and as are the doubts which they involve, these thoughts will pass through their mind, even though to avoid giving needless pain to those who have no such perplexities and difficulties they keep these thoughts to themselves, Psalm 73:15.

    How doth God know? - That is, How can these facts be reconciled with God's omniscience? How can it be that he sees all this, and yet suffers it to occur, or that he does not interpose to prevent it? Is it not a fair inference from these facts that God does "not" see them, and that he is "not" an Omniscient Being? Can it be explained, can it be believed, that God sees all this, and that he calmly looks on, and does nothing to prevent it? If he sees it, why does he not interpose and put an end to it? These perplexities were not confined to the psalmist. They are such as have been felt by good people in all ages; and no one yet has been able to furnish a solution of them that is wholly free from difficulty.

    And is there knowledge in the Most High? - Can there be in God a knowledge of these facts? Are we not driven to the conclusion that he must be ignorant of them? for, if he knew them, would he not interpose to prevent them? How "can" it be consistent with the idea that he "knows" them, and "sees" them, that he does "not" interpose, and that he suffers these things to take place without any attempt to check such evils? Who, even now, can answer these questions?