Search the Bible
* powered by Bible Study Tools

Psalms 73:7

    Psalms 73:7 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    Their eyes stand out with fatness: they have more than heart could wish.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    Their eyes stand out with fatness: they have more than heart could wish.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    Their eyes stand out with fatness: They have more than heart could wish.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    Their eyes are bursting with fat; they have more than their heart's desire.

    Webster's Revision

    Their eyes stand out with fatness: They have more than heart could wish.

    World English Bible

    Their eyes bulge with fat. Their minds pass the limits of conceit.

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    Their eyes stand out with fatness: they have more than heart could wish.

    Clarke's Commentary on Psalms 73:7

    Their eyes stand out with fatness - "Their countenance is changed because of fatness." - Chaldee. By fatness, or corpulency, the natural lines of the face are changed, or rather obliterated. The characteristic distinctions are gone; and we see little remaining besides the human hog.

    They have more than heart could wish - I doubt this translation. Whose heart ever said, I have enough, which had not its portion with God? It would be more literal to say, "They surpass the thoughts of their heart." They have more than they expected, though not more than they wish.

    Barnes' Notes on Psalms 73:7

    Their eyes stand out with fatness - As the fruit of their high living. They are not weakened and emaciated by toil and want, as other men often are. Compare the notes at Psalm 17:10.

    They have more than heart could wish - Margin, "they pass the thoughts of the heart." Literally, "the imaginations or thoughts of the heart pass;" pass along; pass forth. The meaning seems to be, not that they have more than heart could desire, as in our translation - for that would not probably be true; nor, that the thoughts of the heart are "disclosed," as Prof. Alexander supposes - for that idea does not seem to be in the language; but that their thoughts, their plans, their purposes, pass freely along without any obstruction; their wishes are all gratified; their purposes are accomplished; they have all that they wish. Whatever comes into the mind as an object of desire is obtained without hindrance or trouble. They seem only to wish for a thing, or to think of a thing, and they have it.