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Psalms 74:1

    Psalms 74:1 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    O God, why hast thou cast us off for ever? why doth thine anger smoke against the sheep of thy pasture?

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    O God, why have you cast us off for ever? why does your anger smoke against the sheep of your pasture?

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    O God, why hast thou cast us off for ever? Why doth thine anger smoke against the sheep of thy pasture?

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    <Maschil. Of Asaph.> Of God, why have you put us away from you for ever? why is the fire of your wrath smoking against the sheep who are your care?

    Webster's Revision

    O God, why hast thou cast us off for ever? Why doth thine anger smoke against the sheep of thy pasture?

    World English Bible

    God, why have you rejected us forever? Why does your anger smolder against the sheep of your pasture?

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    Maschil of Asaph. O God, why hast thou cast us off for ever? why doth thine anger smoke against the sheep of thy pasture?

    Definitions for Psalms 74:1

    Cast - Worn-out; old; cast-off.
    Doth - To do; to produce; make.

    Clarke's Commentary on Psalms 74:1

    O God, why hast thou cast us off for ever? - Hast thou determined that we shall never more be thy people? Are we never to see an end to our calamities?

    Barnes' Notes on Psalms 74:1

    O God, why hast thou cast us off for ever? - Thou seemest to have cast us off forever, or finally. Compare Psalm 44:9, note; Psalm 13:1, note. "Why doth thine anger smoke." See Deuteronomy 29:20. The presence of smoke indicates fire, and the language here is such as often occurs in the Scriptures, when anger or wrath is compared with fire. See Deuteronomy 32:22; Jeremiah 15:14.

    Against the sheep of thy pasture - Thy people, represented as a flock. See Psalm 79:13; Psalm 95:7. This increases the tenderness of the appeal. The wrath of God seemed to be enkindled against his own people, helpless and defenseless, who needed his care, and who might naturally look for it - as a flock needs the care of a shepherd, and as the care of the shepherd might be expected. He seemed to be angry with his people, and to have cast them off, when they had every reason to anticipate his protection.