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Psalms 74:15

    Psalms 74:15 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    Thou didst cleave the fountain and the flood: thou driedst up mighty rivers.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    You did split the fountain and the flood: you dried up mighty rivers.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    Thou didst cleave fountain and flood: Thou driedst up mighty rivers.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    You made valleys for fountains and springs; you made the ever-flowing rivers dry.

    Webster's Revision

    Thou didst cleave fountain and flood: Thou driedst up mighty rivers.

    World English Bible

    You opened up spring and stream. You dried up mighty rivers.

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    Thou didst cleave fountain and flood: thou driedst up mighty rivers.

    Clarke's Commentary on Psalms 74:15

    Thou didst cleave the fountain - Thou didst cleave the rock in the wilderness, of which all the congregation drank.

    Thou driedst up mighty rivers - Does not this refer to the cutting off the waters of the Jordan, so that the people passed over dryshod?

    Barnes' Notes on Psalms 74:15

    Thou didst cleave the fountain and the flood - That is, the source of the streams and the streams themselves. The main allusion is probably to the Jordan, and the idea is, that God had, as it were, divided all the waters, or prevented any obstruction to his people from the river in any respect; as if the waters in the very springs and fountains, and the waters in the channel of the river flowing from those springs and fountains, had been so restrained and divided that there was a safe passage through them. Joshua 3:14-17.

    Thou driedst up mighty rivers - Margin, "rivers of strength." The Hebrew - איתן 'êythân - (compare Deuteronomy 21:4; Amos 5:24; 1 Kings 8:2) - means rather perennial, constant, ever-flowing. The allusion is to rivers or streams that flow constantly, or that do not dry up. It was this which made the miracle so apparent. It could not be pretended that they had gone over the bed of a stream which was accustomed to be dry at certain seasons of the year. They passed over rivers that never dried up; and, therefore, it could have been only by miracle. The main allusion is undoubtedly to the passage of the Jordan.

    Wesley's Notes on Psalms 74:15

    74:15 The flood - Thou didst by cleaving the rock, make a fountain and a stream to flow from it, for the refreshment of thy people in those dry deserts. Driedst - Jordan and the Red Sea; for the sea itself; yea, a greater sea than that, is called a river, Jonah 2:3, where the Hebrew word is the same which is here used. And the same title is expressly given to the sea, by Homer, and other ancient writers.