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Psalms 77:9

    Psalms 77:9 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    Hath God forgotten to be gracious? hath he in anger shut up his tender mercies? Selah.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    Has God forgotten to be gracious? has he in anger shut up his tender mercies? Selah.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    Hath God forgotten to be gracious? Hath he in anger shut up his tender mercies? Selah

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    Has God put away the memory of his pity? are his mercies shut up by his wrath? (Selah.)

    Webster's Revision

    Hath God forgotten to be gracious? Hath he in anger shut up his tender mercies? Selah

    World English Bible

    Has God forgotten to be gracious? Has he, in anger, withheld his compassion?" Selah.

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    Hath God forgotten to be gracious? hath he in anger shut up his tender mercies? Selah

    Clarke's Commentary on Psalms 77:9

    Hath God - in anger shut up his tender mercies? - The tender mercies of God are the source whence all his kindness to the children of men flows. The metaphor here is taken from a spring, the mouth of which is closed, so that its waters can no longer run in the same channel; but, being confined, break out, and take some other course. Wilt thou take thy mercy from the Israelites, and give it to some other people? This he most certainly did. He took it from the Jews, and gave it to the Gentiles.

    Barnes' Notes on Psalms 77:9

    Hath God forgotten to be gracious? - Has he passed over mercy in administering his government? Has he ceased to remember that man needs mercy? Has he forgotten that this is an attribute of his own nature?

    Hath he in anger shut up his tender mercies? - The original word here rendered "tender mercies" refers to the "bowels," as the seat of compassion or mercy, in accordance with a usage common in Hebrew. See Psalm 25:6, note; Isaiah 16:11, note; Isaiah 63:15, note. Compare Luke 1:78 (in Greek); Philippians 1:8; Philippians 2:1; 1 John 3:17. We speak of the "heart" as the seat of affection and kindness. The Hebrews included the heart, but they used a more general word. The word rendered "shut up" means "closed;" and the question is whether his mercy was closed, or had ceased forever. The psalmist concludes that if this were done, it must be as the result of anger - anger in view of the sins of people.