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Psalms 78:36

    Psalms 78:36 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    Nevertheless they did flatter him with their mouth, and they lied unto him with their tongues.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    Nevertheless they did flatter him with their mouth, and they lied to him with their tongues.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    But they flattered him with their mouth, And lied unto him with their tongue.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    But their lips were false to him, and their tongues were untrue to him;

    Webster's Revision

    But they flattered him with their mouth, And lied unto him with their tongue.

    World English Bible

    But they flattered him with their mouth, and lied to him with their tongue.

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    But they flattered him with their mouth, and lied unto him with their tongue.

    Clarke's Commentary on Psalms 78:36

    Nevertheless they did flatter him with their mouth - What idea could such people have of God, whom they supposed they could thus deceive? They promised well, they called him their God, and their fathers' God; and told him how good, and kind, and merciful he had been to them. Thus, their mouth flattered him. And they said that, whatever the Lord their God commanded them to do, they would perform.

    And they lied unto him - I think the Vulgate gives the true sense of the Hebrew: Dilexerunt eum in ore suo; et lingua sua mentiti Bunt ei, - "They loved him with their mouth; and they lied unto him with their tongue." "That is," says the old Psalter, "thai sayde thai lufed God, bot thai lighed, als thair dedes schewes; for thai do noght als thai hight; for when God ceses to make men rad; than cese thai to do wele."

    Barnes' Notes on Psalms 78:36

    Nevertheless they did flatter him with their mouth - The word rendered "flatter" means properly "to open;" and hence, "to be open; to be ingenious or frank;" and then, to be easily persuaded, to be deluded, to be beguiled; and hence, also, in an active form, to persuade, to entice, to seduce, to beguile, to delude. The meaning here is, that they attempted to deceive by their professions, or that their professions were false and hollow. Those professions were the mere result of affliction. They were based on no principle; there was no true love or confidence at the foundation. Such professions or promises are often made in affliction. Under the pressure of heavy judgments, the loss of property, the loss of friends, or the failure of health, people become serious, and resolve to give attention to religion. It is rarely that such purposes are founded in sincerity, and that the conversions apparently resulting from them are true conversions. The Septuagint and the Latin Vulgate render the phrase here, "They loved with their mouth."

    And they lied unto him with their tongues - They made promises which they did not keep.

    Wesley's Notes on Psalms 78:36

    78:36 Lied - They made but false protestations of their sincere resolutions of future obedience.