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Psalms 78:41

    Psalms 78:41 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    Yea, they turned back and tempted God, and limited the Holy One of Israel.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    Yes, they turned back and tempted God, and limited the Holy One of Israel.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    And they turned again and tempted God, And provoked the Holy One of Israel.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    Again they put God to the test, and gave pain to the Holy One of Israel.

    Webster's Revision

    And they turned again and tempted God, And provoked the Holy One of Israel.

    World English Bible

    They turned again and tempted God, and provoked the Holy One of Israel.

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    And they turned again and tempted God, and provoked the Holy One of Israel.

    Definitions for Psalms 78:41

    Yea - Yes; certainly.

    Clarke's Commentary on Psalms 78:41

    Limited the Holy One of Israel - The Chaldee translates, "And the Holy One of Israel they signed with a sign." The Hebrew word התוו hithvu is supposed to come from the root תוה tavah, which signifies to mark; and hence the letter ת tau, which in the ancient Hebrew character had the form of a cross X, had its name probably because it was used as a mark. Mr. Bate observes that in hithpael it signifies to challenge or accuse; as one who gives his quark or pledge upon a trial, and causes his adversary to do the same. Here it most obviously means an insult offered to God.

    Barnes' Notes on Psalms 78:41

    Yea, they turned back, and tempted God - They turned away from his service; they were disposed to return to Egypt, and to place themselves in the condition in which they were before they were delivered from bondage.

    And limited the Holy One of Israel - The idea is, that they set a limit to the power of God; they fancied or alleged - (and this is a thing often done practically even by the professed people of God) - that there was a boundary in respect to power which he could not pass, or that there were things to be done which he had not the ability to perform. The original word - תוה tâvâh - occurs but three times in the Scriptures; in 1 Samuel 21:13, where it is rendered scrabbled (in the margin, made marks); in Ezekiel 9:4, where it is rendered set, that is, set a mark (margin, mark); and in the place before us. It is rendered here by the Septuagint and the Latin Vulgate, to provoke to anger. DeWette translates it troubled. Professor Alexander, "On the Holy One of Israel (they) set a mark." The idea in the word would seem to be that of making a mark for any purpose; and then it means to delineate; to scrawl; or to set a mark for a limit or boundary. Thus it might be applied to God - as if, in estimating his character or his power, they set limits or bounds to it, as one does in marking out a farm or a house-lot in a city or town. There was a limit, in their estimation, to the power of God, beyond which he could not act; or, in other words, his power was defined and bounded, so that beyond a certain point he could not aid them.