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Psalms 8:8

    Psalms 8:8 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    The fowl of the air, and the fish of the sea, and whatsoever passeth through the paths of the seas.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    The fowl of the air, and the fish of the sea, and whatever passes through the paths of the seas.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    The birds of the heavens, and the fish of the sea, Whatsoever passeth through the paths of the seas.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    The birds of the air and the fish of the sea, and whatever goes through the deep waters of the seas.

    Webster's Revision

    The birds of the heavens, and the fish of the sea, Whatsoever passeth through the paths of the seas.

    World English Bible

    The birds of the sky, the fish of the sea, and whatever passes through the paths of the seas.

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    The fowl of the air, and the fish of the sea, whatsoever passeth through the paths of the seas.

    Definitions for Psalms 8:8

    Sea - Large basin.

    Clarke's Commentary on Psalms 8:8

    The fowl of the air - All these were given to man in the beginning; and he has still a general dominion over them; for thus saith the Lord: "The fear of you, and the dread of you, shall be upon every Beast of the Earth, and upon every Fowl of the Air, and upon all that Moveth upon the Earth, and upon all the Fishes of the Sea; into your hand are they delivered;" Genesis 9:2. To this passage the psalmist most obviously refers.

    Psalm 8:8Volucres celi et pisces maris qui perambulant semitas maris.

    Trans. Fowls of heven and fysche of the see, that gas the wayes of the see.

    Par. "Fowls of heven", er prowde men that wald hee thair setil abouen al other. "Fysches of the see", er covaytus men, the qwilk in the ground of the werld, sekes erthdly gudes, that all stretes in the see, sone wither oway. Al thir sal be underlout til Crist onther herts in grace, or thare in pine.

    Barnes' Notes on Psalms 8:8

    The fowl of the air - Genesis 1:26, "Over the fowl of the air." Genesis 9:2, "upon every fowl of the air." This dominion is the more remarkable because the birds of the air seem to be beyond the reach of man; and yet, equally with the beasts of the field, they are subject to his control. Man captures and destroys them; he prevents their multiplication and their ravages. Numerous as they are, and rapid as is their flight, and strong as many of them are, they have never succeeded in making man subject to them, or in disturbing the purposes of man. See the notes at James 3:7.

    And the fish of the sea - Genesis 1:26, "Over the fish of the sea." Genesis 9:2, "upon all the fishes of the sea." This must be understood in a general sense, and this is perhaps still more remarkable than the dominion over the beasts of the field and the fowls of the air, for the fishes that swim in the ocean seem to be placed still farther from the control of man. Yet, so far as is necessary for his use and for safety, they are, in fact, put under the control of man, and he makes them minister to his profit. Not a little of that which contributes to the support the comfort, and the luxury of man, comes from the ocean. From the mighty whale to the shellfish that furnished the Tyrian dye, or to that which furnishes the beautiful pearl, man has shown his power to make the dwellers in the deep subservient to his will.

    And whatsoever passeth through the paths of the seas - Everything, in general, that passes through the paths of the sea, as if the ocean was formed with paths or highways for them to pass over. Some have referred this to man, as passing over the sea and subduing its inhabitants; some, to the fishes before spoken of; but the most natural construction is that which is adotpted in our received version, as referring to everything which moves in the waters. The idea is that man has a wide and universal dominion - a dominion so wide as to excite amazement, wonder, and gratitude, that it has been conceded to one so feeble as he is.