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Psalms 81:4

    Psalms 81:4 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    For this was a statute for Israel, and a law of the God of Jacob.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    For this was a statute for Israel, and a law of the God of Jacob.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    For it is a statute for Israel, An ordinance of the God of Jacob.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    For this is a rule for Israel, and a law of the God of Jacob.

    Webster's Revision

    For it is a statute for Israel, An ordinance of the God of Jacob.

    World English Bible

    For it is a statute for Israel, an ordinance of the God of Jacob.

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    For it is a statute for Israel, an ordinance of the God of Jacob.

    Clarke's Commentary on Psalms 81:4

    This was a statute for Israel - See the statute, Numbers 10:10 (note), and Leviticus 23:24 (note).

    Barnes' Notes on Psalms 81:4

    For this was a statute for Israel ... - See Exodus 12:3. That is, it was a law for the whole Jewish people, for all who had the name Israel, for all the descendants of Jacob. The word was is not in the original, as if this had been an old commandment which might now be obsolete, but the idea is one of perpetuity: it is a perpetual law for the Hebrew people.

    A law of the God of Jacob - Hebrew, a judgment; or, right. The idea is, that it was what was due to God; what was his right. It was a solemn claim that he should be thus acknowledged. It was not a matter of conventional arrangement, or a matter of convenience to them; nor was it to be observed merely because it was found to be expedient and conducive to the welfare of the nation. It was a matter of right and of claim on the part of God, and was so to be regarded by the nation. The same is true now of the Sabbath, and of all the appointments which God has made for keeping up religion in the world. All these arrangements are indeed expedient and proper; they conduce to the public welfare and to the happiness of man; but there is a higher reason for their observance than this. It is that God demands their observance; that he claims as his own the time so appropriated. Thus he claims the Sabbath, the entire Sabbath, as his own; he requires that it shall be employed in his service, that it shall be regarded as his day; that it shall be made instrumental in keeping up the knowledge of himself in the world, and in promoting his glory. Exodus 20:10. People, therefore, "rob God" (compare Malachi 3:8) when they take this time for needless secular purposes, or devote it to other ends and uses. Nor can this be sinless. The highest guilt which man can commit is to "rob" his Maker of what belongs to Him, and of what He claims.