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Psalms 88:15

    Psalms 88:15 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    I am afflicted and ready to die from my youth up: while I suffer thy terrors I am distracted.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    I am afflicted and ready to die from my youth up: while I suffer your terrors I am distracted.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    I am afflicted and ready to die from my youth up: While I suffer thy terrors I am distracted.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    I have been troubled and in fear of death from the time when I was young; your wrath is hard on me, and I have no strength.

    Webster's Revision

    I am afflicted and ready to die from my youth up: While I suffer thy terrors I am distracted.

    World English Bible

    I am afflicted and ready to die from my youth up. While I suffer your terrors, I am distracted.

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    I am afflicted and ready to die from my youth up: while I suffer thy terrors I am distracted.

    Clarke's Commentary on Psalms 88:15

    From my youth up - I have always been a child of sorrow, afflicted in my body, and distressed in my mind. There are still found in the Church of God persons in similar circumstances; persons who are continually mourning for themselves and for the desolations of Zion. A disposition of this kind is sure to produce an unhealthy body; and indeed a weak constitution may often produce an enfeebled mind; but where the terrors of the Lord prevail, there is neither health of body nor peace of mind.

    Barnes' Notes on Psalms 88:15

    I am afflicted and ready to die - I am so afflicted - so crushed with sorrow and trouble - that my strength is nearly gone, and I can endure it but a little longer.

    From my youth up - That is, for a long time; so long, that the remembrance of it seems to go back to my very childhood. My whole life has been a life of trouble and sorrow, and I have not strength to bear it longer. It may have been literally true that the author of the psalm had been a man always afflicted; or, this may be the language of strong emotion, meaning that his sufferings had been of so long continuance that they seemed to him to have begun in his very boyhood.

    While I suffer thy terrors - I bear those things which produce terror; or, which fill my mind with alarm; to wit, the fear of death, and the dread of the future world.

    I am distracted - I cannot compose and control my mind; I cannot pursue any settled course of thought; I cannot confine my attention to anyone subject; I cannot reason calmly on the subject of affliction, on the divine government, on the ways of God. I am distracted with contending feelings, with my pain, and my doubts, and my fears - and I cannot think clearly of anything. Such is often the case in sickness; and consequently what we need, to prepare us for sickness, is a strong faith, built on a solid foundation while we are in health; such an intelligent and firm faith that when the hour of sickness shall come we shall have nothing else to do but to believe, and to take the comfort of believing. The bed of sickness is not the proper place to examine the evidences of religion; it is not the place to make preparation for death; not the proper place to become religious. Religion demands the best vigor of the intellect and the calmest state of the heart; and this great subject should be settled in our minds before we are sick - before we are laid on the bed of death.