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Psalms 91:10

    Psalms 91:10 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    There shall no evil befall thee, neither shall any plague come nigh thy dwelling.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    There shall no evil befall you, neither shall any plague come near your dwelling.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    There shall no evil befall thee, Neither shall any plague come nigh thy tent.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    No evil will come on you, and no disease will come near your tent.

    Webster's Revision

    There shall no evil befall thee, Neither shall any plague come nigh thy tent.

    World English Bible

    no evil shall happen to you, neither shall any plague come near your dwelling.

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    There shall no evil befall thee, neither shall any plague come nigh thy tent.

    Definitions for Psalms 91:10

    Nigh - Near.

    Barnes' Notes on Psalms 91:10

    There shall no evil befall thee - The Chaldee Paraphrase has, "The Lord of the world answered and said, 'There shall no evil befall thee,'" etc. The sentiment, however, is that the psalmist could assure such an one, from his own personal experience, that he would be safe. He had himself made Yahweh his refuge, and he could speak with confidence of the safety of doing so. This, of course, is to be understood as a general truth, in accordance with what has been said above.

    Neither shall any plague come nigh thy dwelling - On the word rendered "plague" here נגע nega‛ - see Psalm 38:12, note; Psalm 39:11, note. It is not the same word which is used in Psalm 91:6, and translated "pestilence;" and it does not refer to what is technically called the "plague." It may denote anything that would be expressive of the divine displeasure, or that would be sent as a punishment. The word rendered "dwelling" here means a tent; and the idea is, that no such mark of displeasure would abide with him, or enter his tent as its home. Of course, this also must be understood as a general promise, or as meaning that religion would constitute a general ground of security.