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Psalms 91:13

    Psalms 91:13 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    Thou shalt tread upon the lion and adder: the young lion and the dragon shalt thou trample under feet.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    You shall tread on the lion and adder: the young lion and the dragon shall you trample under feet.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    Thou shalt tread upon the lion and adder: The young lion and the serpent shalt thou trample under foot.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    You will put your foot on the lion and the snake; the young lion and the great snake will be crushed under your feet.

    Webster's Revision

    Thou shalt tread upon the lion and adder: The young lion and the serpent shalt thou trample under foot.

    World English Bible

    You will tread on the lion and cobra. You will trample the young lion and the serpent underfoot.

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    Thou shalt tread upon the lion and adder: the young lion and the serpent shalt thou trample under feet.

    Definitions for Psalms 91:13

    Adder - A venomous snake.
    Dragon - Jackal; wild dog.

    Clarke's Commentary on Psalms 91:13

    Thou shalt tread upon the lion and adder - Even the king of the forest shall not be able to injure thee; should one of these attack thee, the angels whom God sends will give thee an easy victory over him. And even the asp, (פתן pethen), one of the most venomous of serpents, shall not be able to injure thee.

    The asp is a very small serpent, and peculiar to Egypt and Libya. Its poison kills without the possibility of a remedy. Those who are bitten by it die in about from three to eight hours; and it is said they die by sleep, without any kind of pain. Lord Bacon says the asp is less painful than all the other instruments of death. He supposes it to have an affinity to opium, but to be less disagreeable in its operation. It was probably an this account that Cleopatra, queen of Egypt, chose to die by the asp, as she was determined to prevent the designs of Augustus, who intended to have carried her captive to Rome to grace his triumph.

    The dragon shalt thou trample - The תנין tannin, which we translate dragon, means often any large aquatic animal; and perhaps here the crocodile or alligator.

    Barnes' Notes on Psalms 91:13

    Thou shalt tread upon the lion and adder - Thou shalt be safe among dangers, as if the rage of the lion were restrained, and he became like a lamb, and as if the poisonous tooth of the serpent were extracted. Compare Mark 16:18. The word used here to denote the "lion" is a poetic term, not employed in prose. The word rendered "adder" is, in the margin, asp. The Hebrew word - פתן pethen - commonly means viper, asp, or adder. See Job 20:14, note; Job 20:16, note; compare Psalm 58:4; Isaiah 11:8. It may be applied to any venomous serpent.

    The young lion - The "young" lion is mentioned as particularly fierce and violent. See Psalm 17:12.

    And the dragon ... - Hebrew, תנין tannı̂yn. See Psalm 74:13, note; Job 7:12, note; Isaiah 27:1, note. In Exodus 7:9-10, Exodus 7:12, the word is rendered serpent (and serpents); in Genesis 1:21; and Job 7:12; whale (and whales); in Deuteronomy 32:33; Nehemiah 2:13; Psalm 74:13; Psalm 148:7; Isaiah 27:1; Isaiah 51:9; Jeremiah 51:34, as here, dragon (and dragons); in Lamentations 4:3, sea monsters. The word does not occur elsewhere. It would perhaps properly denote a sea monster; yet it may be applied to a serpent. Thus applied, it would denote a serpent of the largest and most dangerous kind; and the idea is, that he who trusted in God would be safe amidst the most fearful dangers, as if he should walk safely amidst venomous serpents.

    Wesley's Notes on Psalms 91:13

    91:13 The lion - Shall lie prostrate at thy feet, and thou shalt securely put thy feet upon his neck. Dragon - By which he understands all pernicious creatures, though never so strong, and all sorts of enemies.