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Psalms 91:3

    Psalms 91:3 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    Surely he shall deliver thee from the snare of the fowler, and from the noisome pestilence.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    Surely he shall deliver you from the snare of the fowler, and from the noisome pestilence.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    For he will deliver thee from the snare of the fowler, And from the deadly pestilence.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    He will take you out of the bird-net, and keep you safe from wasting disease.

    Webster's Revision

    For he will deliver thee from the snare of the fowler, And from the deadly pestilence.

    World English Bible

    For he will deliver you from the snare of the fowler, and from the deadly pestilence.

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    For he shall deliver thee from the snare of the fowler, and from the noisome pestilence.

    Definitions for Psalms 91:3

    Fowler - One who snares birds.
    Noisome - Bad; foul.

    Clarke's Commentary on Psalms 91:3

    Surely he shall deliver thee - If thou wilt act thus, then the God in whom thou trustest will deliver thee from the snare of the fowler, from all the devices of Satan, and from all dangerous maladies. As the original word, דבר dabar, signifies a word spoken, and deber, the same letters, signifies pestilence; so some translate one way, and some another: he shall deliver thee from the evil and slanderous word; he shall deliver thee from the noisome pestilence - all blasting and injurious winds, effluvia, etc.

    Barnes' Notes on Psalms 91:3

    Surely he shall deliver thee from the snare of the fowler - The snare or gin set for catching birds; meaning, here, that God would save him from the purposes of wicked people; such purposes as might be compared with the devices employed to catch birds. On the meaning of the figure used here, see the notes at Psalm 18:5.

    And from the noisome pestilence - The "fatal" pestilence; the pestilence that spreads death in its march. That is, he can prevent its coming upon you; or, he can save you from its ravages, while others are dying around you. This promise is not to be understood as absolute, or as meaning that no one who fears God will ever fall by the pestilence - for good people "do" die at such times as well as bad people; but the idea is, that God "can" preserve us at such a time and that, as a great law, he will be thus the protector of those who trust him. It is to be remembered that in times of pestilence (as was the case during the prevalence of the Asiatic cholera in 1832 and 1848), very many of the victims are the intemperate, the sensual, the debased, and that a life of this kind is a predisposing cause of death in such visitations of judgment. A large part of those who die are of that number. From the danger arising from this cause, of course the virtuous, the temperate, the pious are exempt; and this is one of the methods by which God saves those who trust in him from the "noisome pestilence." Religion, therefore, to a considerable extent, constitutes a ground of security at such times; nor is there any reason to doubt that, in many cases also, there may be a special interposition protecting the friends of God from danger, and sparing them for future usefulness. The promise here is substantially that general promise which we have in the Scriptures everywhere, that God is the Protector of his people, and that they may put their trust in him.