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Psalms 91:6

    Psalms 91:6 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    Nor for the pestilence that walketh in darkness; nor for the destruction that wasteth at noonday.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    Nor for the pestilence that walks in darkness; nor for the destruction that wastes at noonday.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    For the pestilence that walketh in darkness, Nor for the destruction that wasteth at noonday.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    Or of the disease which takes men in the dark, or of the destruction which makes waste when the sun is high.

    Webster's Revision

    For the pestilence that walketh in darkness, Nor for the destruction that wasteth at noonday.

    World English Bible

    nor of the pestilence that walks in darkness, nor of the destruction that wastes at noonday.

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    For the pestilence that walketh in darkness, nor for the destruction that wasteth at noonday.

    Clarke's Commentary on Psalms 91:6

    Nor for the pestilence that walketh in darkness; nor for the destruction that wasteth at noonday - The rabbins supposed that the empire of death was under two demons, one of which ruled by day, the other by night. The Vulgate and Septuagint have - the noonday devil. The ancients thought that there were some demons who had the power to injure particularly at noonday. To this Theocritus refers, Id. 1: ver. 15: -

    Ου θεμις, ω ποιμαν, το μεσαμβρινον, ου θεμις αμμιν

    Συρισδεν· τον Πανα δεδοικαμες· η γαρ απ' αγρας

    Τανικα κεκμακως αμπαυεται, εντι γε πικρος,

    Και οἱ αει δριμεια χολα ποτι ῥινι καθηται.

    "It is not lawful, it is not lawful, O shepherd, to play on the flute at noonday: we fear Pan, who at that hour goes to sleep in order to rest himself after the fatigues of the chase; then he is dangerous, and his wrath easily kindled."

    Lucan, in the horrible account he gives us of a grove sacred to some barbarous power, worshipped with the most horrid rites, refers to the same superstition: -

    Lucus erat longo nunquam violatus ab aevo,

    Non illum cultu populi propiore frequentant,

    Sed cessere deis: medio cum Phoebus in axe est.

    Aut coelum nox atra tenet, pavet ipse sacerdos

    Accessus, dominumque timet deprendere luci.

    Lucan, lib. iii., ver. 399.

    "Not far away, for ages past, had stood

    continued...

    Barnes' Notes on Psalms 91:6

    Nor for the pestilence - The plague or pestilence was common in Oriental countries.

    That walketh in darkness - Not that it particularly comes in the night, but that it seems to creep along as if in the night; that is, where one cannot mark its progress, or anticipate when or whom it will strike. The laws of its movements are unknown, and it comes upon people as an enemy that suddenly attacks us in the night.

    Nor for the destruction - The word used here - קטב qeṭeb - means properly a cutting off, a destruction, as a destroying storm, Isaiah 28:2; and then, contagious pestilence, Deuteronomy 32:24. It may be applied here to anything that sweeps away people - whether storm, war, pestilence, or famine.

    That wasteth at noonday - It lays waste, or produces desolation, at noon; that is, visibly, openly. The meaning is, that whenever, or in whatever form, calamity comes which sweeps away the race - whether at midnight or at noon - whether in the form of pestilence, war, or famine - he who trusts in God need not - will not - be afraid. He will feel either that he will be preserved from its ravages, or that if he is cut off he has nothing to fear. He is a friend of God, and he has a hope of a better life. In death, and in the future world, there is nothing of which he should be afraid. The Septuagint and the Latin Vulgate render this, strangely enough, "Nor of mischance and the demon of noonday."

    Wesley's Notes on Psalms 91:6

    91:6 Darkness - Invisibly, so that we can neither foresee nor prevent it.